Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures as she arrives to speak at the African Methodist Episcopal Church convention in Philadelphia on July 8. (Matt Rourke/AP)

ORLANDO — The Democratic National Committee added a call for a $15 minimum wage to its 2016 platform, a victory for progressives produced by a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Just an hour later, however, Clinton-loyal members of the platform committee defeated two amendments that would have committed the party to expanding Social Security — a moment marked by cries of "Shame!" and "Are you Democrats?" from Sanders supporters sitting in the observation area of the Hilton hotel where the party was meeting.

The minimum wage plank sailed through early, after Nina Turner, a prominent Sanders supporter from Ohio, introduced and opened it for friendly amendments. Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union, quickly obliged, and the new language eliminated wiggle room over when the party would favor a doubling of the wage.

The language at the start of the day was as follows:

Democrats believe that the current minimum wage is a starvation wage and must be increased to a living wage. No one who works full time should have to raise a family in poverty. We believe that Americans should earn at least $15 an hour and have the right to form or join a union. We applaud the approaches taken by states like New York and California. We should raise and index the minimum wage, give all Americans the ability to join a union regardless of where they work, and create new ways for workers to have power in the economy. We also support creating one fair wage for all workers by ending the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers and people with disabilities.

The language passed by the platform committee was strengthened as shown by the bold text below.

Democrats believe that the current minimum wage is a starvation wage and must be increased to a living wage. No one who works full time should have to raise a family in poverty. We believe that Americans should earn at least $15 an hour and have the right to form or join a union and will work in every way we can — in Congress and the federal government, in states, and with the private sector — to reach this goal. We should raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour over time and index it, give all Americans the ability to join a union regardless of where they work, and create new ways for workers to have power in the economy so every worker can earn at least $15 an hour. We applaud the approaches taken by states like New York and California. We also support creating one fair wage for all workers by ending the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers and people with disabilities.

The good feelings from that vote did not last. After midnight, during a session that began nearly two hours after it was scheduled, two amendments on Social Security policy got speedy rejections. One would have eliminated the cap on Social Security taxes; another would have created a new cost of living index for Social Security benefits to replace the cost of living adjustment, or COLA. The platform as it existed promised that Democrats would "expand" Social Security, but Sanders allies wanted details above and beyond what was passed at the drafting meeting in St. Louis.

"This is smart politics, and if the Republicans are smart, they'll have it in their platform, too," said Eric Kingson, a Social Security expert who ran a strong but unsuccessful primary bid for Congress in New York, with Sanders's backing.

But to the dismay of the few dozen progressive activists in the back of the room, both amendments failed by about the margin that Clinton enjoyed over Sanders on the committee. (The ballot itself was secret.)

"This election is on your heads!" one Sanders supporter heckled.

The Sanders campaign was hardly routed. It declared victory on a lesser-known amendment, promising to "protect the earned pension benefits of Americans in multi-employer pension plans" by taxing millionaires.