ORLANDO — Hillary Clinton gave voice Wednesday to a question on the minds of many of her fiercest advocates in her race against the controversy-prone Donald Trump: Why isn’t she way, way ahead?

The Democratic nominee raised the issue here during an address via video conference to a gathering in Las Vegas of the Laborers' International Union of North America.

The former secretary of state ticked off her pro-union positions, including investing in infrastructure, raising the minimum wage and supporting collective bargaining.

Hillary Clinton’s campaign comes to an end

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MANHATTAN, NY - The morning after loosing to Republican Nominee Donald Trump in the general Presidential election, Democratic Nominee for President of the United States former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by former President Bill Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, Senator Tim Kaine and Anne Holton, speaks to supporters and campaign staff in a packed ballroom at The New Yorker Hotel in midtown Manhattan, New York on Wednesday November 9, 2016. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

“Having said all this, ‘Why aren’t I 50 points ahead?’ you might ask?” Clinton said. “Well, the choice for working families has never been clearer. I need your help to get Donald Trump’s record out to everybody. Nobody should be fooled.”

Trump has sought to appeal to working-class voters through promises of job creation and the renegotiation of trade deals, among other things.

But Clinton noted some of Trump’s anti-union positions and accused the real estate magnate of building his wealth by “stiffing small businesses and contractors.”

“If you do know somebody who might be voting for Trump, stage an intervention,” Clinton pleaded with her remote audience. “Try to talk some sense into them. Lay out the facts. The facts are on our side, about what I’ve done versus what he’s done. Remember, friends don’t let friends vote for Trump.”

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton seeks to allay concerns of voters who still have questions about her saying, "I get that."