Democrats are maintaining a wide lead over Republicans among Hispanic voters nationwide, but Hillary Clinton has softer support among younger Hispanics and Donald Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric is not necessarily a liability, according to one of the most comprehensive polls this year of the nation's largest minority group.

Trump's comments about Mexican immigrants have resonated widely, according to the survey by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center. Three-quarters of Hispanic registered voters say they have discussed the comments with family, friends and co-workers in the past year. Of those voters, 74 percent say they are “absolutely certain” they will vote, Pew said.

But 21 percent of registered Latinos who have talked about Trump's rhetoric with friends and family say they still plan to vote for him — a signal that a notable percentage of Latinos are not dissuaded by the Republican presidential nominee's talk. Trump receives less support among Latino voters who have not talked about him, 12 percent.

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Clinton holds wide lead over Trump among various Hispanic groups

The share of Latino registered voters who say they are “absolutely certain” they will vote next month is down to 69 percent in this poll, compared with 77 percent who said so in a similar 2012 poll. One of the sharpest declines is among Latino millennials — those ages 18 to 35 this year. Just 62 percent say they are absolutely certain to vote this year, compared with 74 percent in 2012.

That seems to be a contributing factor in the softer support for Clinton. Her support among millennial Latinos is 18 percentage points lower than among those who are older (48 percent vs. 66 percent). In addition, Pew finds that nearly two-thirds of Latino millennials who support Clinton say their support is more a vote against Trump than a vote for her. Among older Latinos, 65 percent say their support for Clinton is more a vote for her than a vote against Trump.

Those generational divides have been reflected among voters overall this year, as Clinton has struggled to build rock-solid support among younger voters, who are signaling increased interest in voting for minor-party candidates such as Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party nominee Jill Stein.

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Among Latinos overall, roughly six in 10 favor Clinton (58 percent), while 19 percent favor Trump; 10 percent are backing Johnson; and 6 percent prefer Stein.

Clinton’s lead over Trump among Latino registered voters is smaller than Obama’s four years ago — she’s up 39 points vs. Obama’s 44-point edge in the 2012 exit poll and his 48-point lead in a similar survey by Pew in 2012.

More than half of Latino registered voters (54 percent) say the Democratic Party is more concerned about Latinos compared with the Republican Party (11 percent), but 28 percent don't think there's any difference between the parties. Democrats held a bigger advantage in a similar Pew poll four years ago — 61 percent to 10 percent over Republicans.

The Pew Research Center's annual National Survey of Latinos was conducted from Aug. 23 through Sept. 21 among 1,507 Latino adults, including 804 registered voters. The margin of sampling error for overall results among registered voters is plus or minus 4.6 percentage points.

Scott Clement contributed to this report.

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