Republican presidential candidate Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

You know you’re losing when Donald Trump stops responding to you on Twitter.

That’s the situation facing Bobby Jindal, the Republican governor of Louisiana, who is currently tied for 10th place in the GOP presidential field.

Jindal is on a desperate mission to troll Trump by whatever means possible. Television hits, interviews, speeches, social media — it’s all part of the playbook to boost Jindal’s visibility in the early states where Trump is dominating the race.

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As you might expect, it’s a tough climb. Jindal received only 1 percent of the vote nationwide in a new Washington Post-ABC News poll of Republican-leaning voters. That puts him on par with Rick Santorum, Chris Christie and Rick Perry, who left the presidential race on Friday.

Still, Jindal is undaunted: He’s hammering Trump at every turn. Trump is a “narcissist,” an “egomaniac” and a “carnival act,” Jindal said Friday.

The attacks are even more apparent on Twitter, where Jindal has tweeted at or about Trump a staggering 55 times in less than two weeks. The barrage started on Sept. 4, when Jindal tried to jump into the media melee surrounding Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis:

Jindal took a new turn on Sept. 9 when he tried to create a meme comparing Trump to actor Charlie Sheen:

But the bulk of the tweets took place Sept. 10 as Jindal doubled down on calling Trump a “narcissist”:

We’ll take a moment here to point out the difficulty of using “narcissist” as a campaign attack. After all, doesn’t every presidential candidate fit the bill?

The most colorful of Jindal’s tweets came on Saturday, accompanied by a picture of a shirtless Vladimir Putin:

Jindal appeared Monday on Fox News to defend the attacks (watch below). “Is this what you want to be doing?” asked a skeptical Martha MacCallum, host of “America’s Newsroom.”

“Martha, our strategy is actually working,” Jindal replied. “We’re moving up in the polls in Iowa … Somebody’s got to say the emperor’s got no clothes.”

On the polling claim, it’s hard to find evidence that Jindal is right. Polls aggregated by Real Clear Politics show he’s hovering at between 2 and 3 percent among Iowa Republicans. Maybe there is a bump coming, but he’s still 11th in the state — and more than 20 points behind Trump.

Speaking of Trump, here’s how he responded to Jindal:

Proving once again: no one out-trolls Trump.