A man looks at his iPhone 6 Plus outside the Apple store in Pasadena, Cali., on Sept. 19, 2014. (ROBYN BECK /AFP/Getty Images)

LAWSUIT OVER ‘ERROR 53’: Apple is facing a class-action lawsuit over an error that can make phones inoperable if they’ve had third-party work done on the device’s home buttons. “Apple has previously acknowledged the problem, explaining the error as a security measure in a statement to the Guardian. The firm said that the error is triggered by processes that ensure iPhone’s fingerprint scanner, called Touch ID, is working as it should and that no one has maliciously tampered with it. Without having Apple revalidate the sensor once a phone has been opened, the company said, its impossible for the phone to tell whether the repair was above-board or not,” The Washington Post reports.

IPO CHILL TO IPO FREEZE? Don’t expect a great season for initial public offerings in the technology sector, Reuters reports. “With the battering technology stocks have suffered in the past couple of weeks, and the dismal performance of technology IPOs in the past couple of years, any idea of a springtime busy with technology offerings may also be wishful thinking … The cratering in technology stocks has also helped to push down the valuations of private tech companies and interest in investing in them, say capital markets experts. Fewer options for capital raising means that high-flying companies may need to rein in spending, delay some ambitious expansion plans and even lay off staff, according to investors and tech consultants.”

DRONE FLIES AT 45 MPH: The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is testing drone technology loaded with sensors and cameras that can fly through indoor environments at 45 mph, The Post reports. “The technology could be especially useful in addressing what the military sees as a shortfall. While small drones are now commercially available, it is difficult to navigate them through buildings, wreckage and other potentially dangerous environments without entering. Better drones might allow them to find survivors after a bombing, look for booby traps or test the air quality before entering dangerous areas,” the paper reports.