In October, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, Melania Trump and family members at the opening of the Trump International Hotel in Washington. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press)

This post has been updated.

Visitors to the newly revamped White House website get more than a simple rundown of first lady Melania Trump’s charitable works and interests — they also get a list of her magazine cover appearances and details on her jewelry line at QVC.

Her biography starts with traditional details, such as her date of birth in her native country of Slovenia and information about her background as a model. That’s when the brief backgrounder takes a promotional turn. The website includes a lengthy list of brands that hired her as a model and several of the magazines in which she appeared, including the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue.

It is not uncommon for the White House to note the accomplishments of the first lady in her official biography, but Trump’s decision to include a detailed list of her media appearances and branded retail goods is unusual.

The site also touches on the previously controversial subject of Melania Trump’s university background.

“She would pursue a degree at the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia, but pause her studies to advance her modeling career in Milan and Paris before moving to New York in 1996,” the site reads.

Melania Trump’s college education was a sensitive point during the campaign. A biography of Trump distributed in a program at the Republican National Convention, which mimicked her biography posted on the Trump Organization, had indicated she had begun modeling “after obtaining a degree in design and architecture at university in Slovenia.” Reporters then learned that she had attended the university but did not graduate, prompting the Trump Organization to remove her biography from the company website altogether.

President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania left St. John's Episcopal Church after a pre-inauguration church service. (The Washington Post)

Rosalind Helderman and Drew Harwell contributed to this report. 

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