House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), right, and ranking Democrat Adam B. Schiff (Calif.) are asking the Justice Department to turn over copies of any applications, orders or warrants related to wiretaps of President Trump or his surrogates, associates, friends and family. (André Chung/The Washington Post)

The heads of the House Intelligence Committee are asking the Justice Department to turn over any wiretapping applications, orders and warrants related to President Trump and his associates, after the president accused the Obama administration of listening in on his communications.

Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) and ranking Democrat Adam B. Schiff (Calif.) sent the request to acting deputy attorney general Dana Boente in a letter dated Wednesday that The Washington Post obtained from a congressional aide.

In it they asked for copies of any applications the Justice Department submitted to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, any orders that court released, and any copies of warrants issued by federal judges or magistrates regarding Trump, his campaign surrogates, business associates, employees, family and friends — “if they exist.”

The broad request is limited to applications, orders and warrants from 2016, and the committee heads are giving the Justice Department until Monday to fulfill the request.

Heads of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on crime and terrorism, Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), submitted a similar request Wednesday to the Justice Department and FBI.

Such requests have been addressed to Boente because Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from all matters involving the Trump campaign.

Nunes told reporters this week that he had seen no evidence that the Obama administration had ordered a wiretap of anyone affiliated with Trump.

“But we also don’t have any evidence of many people who have been named in multiple news stories that supposedly are under some type of investigation,” he added.

The Trump administration has rebuffed several calls to furnish evidence to back up his accusations that his phones had been tapped, which the president first made via Twitter.

Both Nunes and Schiff said this week that the committee would nonetheless investigate Trump’s claims.

Schiff warned, however, that it could be a “scandal” if the president’s “allegations prove to be false.”