Last week we told you all about a new “docu-series” filming in the area that is tentatively (and ridiculously) titled “Potomac Ensemble.”

The show, rumored to be in development at that bastion of quality programming — the Bravo network — promises to follow six local African American women navigating the “cattiness” of Jack and Jill, an elite membership organization founded by a group of Philadelphia mothers in 1938. Pot? Stirred.

Jack and Jill’s national board got wind of the series, which has filmed in Bethesda and on Capitol Hill, and is not, shall we say, pleased.

A letter from the organization’s national president, Tammy King, was e-mailed to members this week. In it, King, a senior vice president at Sotheby’s International Realty Group and an owner of several Wendy’s franchises, according to the Jack and Jill Web site, takes particular umbrage with the gossipy angle of the reality show because it “shines a negative light on our iconic organization.”

“As a result of these recent activities,” King writes, “we think that it is important to review our stated code because as mothers, we all agreed to abide by these rules as a condition of our membership.”

Chief among those edicts, according to the letter? Members are expected to act publicly in a way “that reflects the high moral and ethical character of Jack and Jill mothers” by “exercising good manners, avoiding derogatory, demeaning and insulting remarks, and keeping confidences and maintaining confidentiality.”

Sooo basically doing the exact opposite of what makes for good reality TV.

No word on how the fledgling TV stars, members of two Maryland chapters of the national organization, took their e-scolding, but we hear that the many non-reality-show-cast members are extremely concerned that “Potomac Ensemble” will give Jack and Jill, which provides cultural and educational opportunities for African American children, the “Real Housewives” treatment.