Sen. Amy Klobuchar describes her new memoir as an ode to civility. (AP Photo/Hannah Foslien)

In many ways, GOP candidate Donald Trump has been a gift to Democrats. A less-noticed boon: his brand of insult-laden invective has given Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) a pop culturally relevant way to describe her new memoir, “The Senator Next Door.”

“It’s the anti-Trump book,” she told a group of women gathered for a just-us-high-powered-gals lunch at the Jefferson Hotel on Thursday. In other words, it’s Minnesota nice.

And not just pleasantry for its own sake, said the two-term senator whose name is often mentioned among those who may someday run for national office. “I think civility is important to getting things done,” she said.

But based on Klobuchar’s stories, which on Thursday were cracking up the likes of Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen, media consultant Tammy Haddad, and FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel over halibut and citrus quinoa, we’re not convinced that all those Minnesota folk are so sweet. (We’re looking at you, Sen. Al Franken, Klobuchar’s fellow North Star State Dem.)

Klobuchar told the lunch bunch that she had a horrifying moment after the book was published when she got a call from a man identifying himself as the son of her elementary-school principal, Mrs. Quady. In her book, Klobuchar had recalled when Mrs. Quady, who sported a beehive “the size of a construction cone,” kicked her out of school in the fourth grade for daring to wear pants.

“And he said…’you made fun of her in your book,'” Klobuchar said. “And then I heard this laughing, and he goes, ‘It’s Al!’ and [I realized] it was Franken.”