Hours before U.S.-Germany kickoff, Recife is hit by torrential rain (updated)


(Thomas Eisenhuth / EPA)

Updated with the latest on field conditions and weather

A little over four hours before kickoff in the World Cup game between the United States and Germany, an enormous rainstorm struck, flooding streets and snarling traffic in Recife, Brazil.

Humidity was to be expected, but this was a deluge that, by 9 a.m., had dropped 2.9 inched of rain on the area. Although there were immediate questions about flooding on the pitch, FIFA officials by mid-morning had determined that the match would begin, as scheduled, at noon EDT.

[Follow LIVE updates of today’s United States-Germany and Portugal-Ghana games by clicking here.]

U.S. players won’t have members of their family and friends rooting for them, though. Agent Richard Motzkin tells ESPN’s Jeremy Schaap that some have decided not to attempt to travel to the stadium. Just before kickoff, the area in front of one goal “looked swampy,” Sam Borden of the New York Times reported, and the stands were “sparsely filled.”


This is how one tests the pitch. (Petr David Josek / AP)

 


(Thomas Eisenhuth / EPA)

 

More from the World Cup:

Luis Suarez suspended nine matches, banned for four months

Here’s how the United States can advance at the World Cup

Will FIFA suspend Luis Suarez over biting incident? History says yes.

Torrential rain before U.S.-Germany game

Ghana sends two players home despite final group stage game today

Jurgen Klinsmann gives Americans the day off to watch the game

Scores and schedule | Group standings | Stats leaders

After spending most of her career in traditional print sports journalism, Cindy began blogging and tweeting, first as NFL/Redskins editor, and, since August 2010, at The Early Lead. She also is the social media editor for Sports.

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Matt Bonesteel · June 26, 2014

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