The U.S. Soccer Federation has posted financial statements covering April 2014 through March 2015. While the documents do not shed fresh light on everyone’s favorite topic, coaching salaries, they do include a few tasty items.

What we do know, from last year, about Jurgen Klinsmann’s contract is that it runs through July 31, 2018, at base compensation of $2.5 million and “escalating over the term of the agreement.” It also promises unspecified incentive bonuses hinging on performance in international tournaments. His full compensation between April 2013 and March 2014 was $2.523 million.

The new figure won’t be available until the USSF’s tax statement is posted this winter.

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Women’s coach Jill Ellis agreed to a new contract after overseeing the World Cup championship this summer. The new terms will not be made public until next year. Her previous deal was worth about $200,000 in base salary, plus incentives and bonuses.

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From the new documents …

*National team expenses in 2014-15 were:

$31.1 million for the men’s national team.

$10.3 million for the women’s national team.

The financial period encompassed the 2014 (men’s) World Cup and the last stage of preparations. The period closed before the 2015 (women’s) World Cup.

For the previous fiscal year (April 2013 to March 2014), $18.7 million was spent on the men (World Cup qualifying and early Brazil preparations) and $8.3 million on the women (no major events).

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*The USSF’s agreement to manage the National Women’s Soccer League was to expire this December. Presumably, it has been — or will be — extended. The USSF is not a member of the limited liability company that owns the league — team owners and investors are — and does not collect a management fee or rent. The USSF pumped $1.43 million into the league in 2014-15, up from $670,000 the previous fiscal year.

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*Last October, in conjunction with CONCACAF, the USSF formed the Copa America 2016 Local Organizing Committee. Although the FIFA corruption scandal placed the competition in jeopardy, the tournament is a go and the USSF plans to announce details soon. It will receive a share of ticketing and stadium revenue. On March 13 this year, the USSF gave $500,000 to the local organizing committee as a start-up loan, which will be reimbursed.

*The USSF’s partnership with Soccer United Marketing, MLS’s marketing arm, expired last Dec. 31 but, as of early this year, continued to operate under a “memorandum of understanding with SUM while a new agreement is formalized.” USSF revenue from the agreement rose from $15.4 million in 2013-14 to $18.3 million in 2014-15.

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*The USSF’s contract with Nike, which runs through 2022, reaped $20.3 million in revenue in 2014-15: $10 million base, $1.7 million commitment bonus, $3.9 million of equipment, $4.1 million in merchandise royalties, $500,000 in discretionary funds and $250,000 in World Cup bonuses.

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In 2013-14, revenue was $15.1 million: $8.8 million base, $2.25 million commitment bonus, $3.5 million in equipment and $588,000 in merchandise royalties.

*The USSF has a 25 percent participation in the Professional Referee Organization, which administers the officiating program, and contributed $1.3 million in 2014-15, up from $1.1 million in 2013-14.

*No concerns about a labor dispute ahead of the 2018 World Cup: The collective bargaining agreement between the men’s national team and the USSF is in place until Dec. 31, 2018.

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