NASA's Cassini imaging scientists processed this view of Saturn's moon Dione, taken during a close flyby on June 16, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)
NASA's Cassini imaging scientists processed this view of Saturn's moon Dione, taken during a close flyby on June 16, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

NASA's Cassini spacecraft is doing great science, making important observations of the planet Saturn as it orbits. But it's also taking amazing photos, and this might be the best yet.

[NASA’s Cassini catches sunlight glinting off the oceans of Saturn’s moon]

Saturn looms in the background, with its moon Dione positioned perfectly for its host planet's rings to make it into the shot. Saturn's rings are the most impressive in the solar system. While they're only about 3,200 feet thick at most, they span 175,000 miles in width, which is 1/3 the distance from the Earth to the moon. The rings are made of particles that vary from the size of a speck of dust to the bulk of mountains, and are mostly made of water and ice with some rocky material in the mix.

In the upper right corner, the moon Enceladus appears as a bright dot perched atop the rings.

(NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)
Dione and Saturn's rings. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

The June 16 photos were taken during a breathtakingly close flyby with Dione. The spacecraft came within just 321 miles of the moon's surface.

In August, Cassini will pass even closer to Dione -- just 295 miles from the surface -- during its last planned flyby.

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