On Saturday, Kimberly and Rebecca Yeung tried out a little science project they had been working on for a few weeks.

They launched a craft, which they built themselves, more than 70,000 feet.

Like, really.

Check it out!


Kimberly and Rebecca, by the way, are 8 and 10 years old.


Kimberly Yeung, 8, is in the pink. Rebecca Yeung, 10, is wearing the blue jacket. (Photo courtesy of Winston Yeung)

Queens. (Photo courtesy of Winston Yeung)

GeekWire has the details on the launch, which happened in Washington state, where the Yeung sisters live.

Kimberly and Rebecca designed and crafted a "Loki Lego Launcher" out of wood, a weather balloon and the shafts of archery arrows, the Web site reported. They included on it a picture of their cat, Loki, as well as a "Star Wars" Lego figurine. (That's what you can see in first GIF posted above.) Then they launched it.

According to GeekWire:

The craft traveled the fastest right after the balloon popped at 78,000 feet, reaching 110 km/h, or nearly 70 MPH. It averaged about 35km/h (20 MPH) over its four hour and 20 minute journey.

GoPro cameras captured images of the flight, and data was also recorded. The girls learned about the layers of the atmosphere — about things like temperature and air resistance.

"We were really excited to see it go," Kimberly told The Washington Post. Each time they launch a craft, they say, they want to send up a different Lego figurine.

So, obviously, this is all fantastic. Here are some lessons learned from the project, some of which you can probably apply to your everyday life (just saying):


(Photo courtesy of Winston Yeung)

Kimberly said she was worried they wouldn't recover the craft, or maybe it would land in water. But they did eventually locate it, after a bit of a hunt.

"I have two favorite parts," Rebecca said. "I really like seeing it go up the first time, because it went so fast, seeing it go up. And then finding it was really awesome, too — in the middle of a cow field."


Kimberly, dancing post-launch. (GIF via YouTube footage)

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