I know, I know: You want a rabbit. That's why you’re here and reading this story. But are you sure you have room for this particular rabbit? It’s huge, as demonstrated by this photo that shows the rabbit with an adult human, you know, for scale:


Rabbit, big. (Scottish SPCA)

The rabbit named Atlas — a great name for a massive rabbit — is a seven-month-old continental giant who’s already the size of a West Highland White Terrier and still growing, according to the Scottish SPCA. Atlas’s owner couldn't take care of the rabbit and brought him to the animal organization in Cardonald, Glasgow, the organization said in a press release Monday.

Giant continental rabbits, recognized by the British Rabbit Council, are among the oldest of European breeds and while most stay under the 30 pound mark, a few tip the scales at over 50 pounds. One such rabbit named Darius is about four feet long and could be the longest rabbit in the world; his son, Jeff, could surpass him soon. A record-breaking 55-pound continental named Ralph reportedly ate over $90 worth of food a week when he reached his superlative size, so you should make sure you’ve got room in your budget for plenty of carrots before committing to giant-bunny ownership.

But don't worry about cleaning up giant bunny poo. “They are potty trained,” Annette Edwards, who owns Darius and Jeff, told ABC last year. “They’re very friendly and tame; they follow you around like dogs and they like to play ball. Both of them respond to their names, and they sit when I tell them to.”

So, no, these aren’t your average bunnies. While the Scottish SPCA is looking for a new home for Atlas (more information on that here), the organization’s center manager said such a person needs not just the space for this furry guy but also the knowledge to care for continental giants.

“He is a very friendly rabbit who loves attention and getting cuddles,” the Scottish SPCA center manager, Anna O’Donnell, said in a news release. “Atlas is also an inquisitive boy who makes everyone laugh with his mischievous character.”

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