Former North Carolina State player Dennis Smith, Jr., shown in this 1996 photo, was listed in documents obtained by Yahoo that suggest he received money from agents before turning professional. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File)

North Carolina State has received a grand jury subpoena seeking records as part of the Justice Department’s investigation into corruption in college basketball, a school official confirmed Friday.

The subpoena, issued by a grand jury impaneled in the Southern District of New York, was received Jan. 17, said North Carolina State athletics spokesman Fred Demarest, who declined to disclose any other details about the subpoena and specific records it sought.

“The contents of the subpoena are confidential, and we can’t expand beyond an acknowledgement that we received a request,” Demarest wrote.

No North Carolina State players, coaches or athletics officials have been contacted by the FBI or prosecutors, or called before the grand jury to testify, Demarest said.

N.C. State is the seventh school implicated in the ongoing investigation, which burst into public view in September with the arrests of assistant coaches at Auburn, Arizona, Southern California and Oklahoma State, all accused of taking bribes from a financial advisor and an aspiring NBA agent with the promise to steer college players their way.

Federal prosecutors also have alleged, in court documents, that coaches at Louisville and Miami, later identified as Rick Pitino and Jim Larranaga, were involved in arranging bribes for recruits. Both coaches have denied the allegations, and neither has been charged with a crime. South Carolina, where one of the coaches charged formerly worked, also has received a grand jury subpoena.

While N.C. State’s connection to the investigation is unclear, it could involve Dallas Mavericks point guard Dennis Smith Jr., who played his lone college season at N.C. State in 2016-17. Last month, Yahoo published internal documents from ASM, the professional sports agency raided by the FBI last September, that suggested agents gave Smith money before he turned professional. One document suggested Smith received $43,500, while another document suggested the figure was $73,500.