The Washington Post

Obama: Gun control ‘not something I will be putting off’

President Obama reiterated his commitment to passing new gun control measures in an interview broadcast on Sunday morning, saying he would like to get such legislation done in the first year of his second term. He also expressed skepticism about a proposal to put more armed guards in schools across the country. 

"The question is are we going to be able to have a national conversation and move something through Congress," Obama said on NBC News's "Meet The Press." "I'd like to get it done in the first year. I will put forward a very specific proposal based on the recommendations that Joe Biden's task force is putting together as we speak.  And so this is not something that I will be putting off."

Obama, who recently established a task force led by Vice President Biden to offer recommendations for how to best curb gun violence, also pushed back against an idea the National Rifle Association put forth following the mass shooting earlier this month at a school in Newtown, Conn. As gun control advocates called for tighter restrictions, the NRA urged that armed guards be placed in schools to deter and defend against future acts of violence. 

"I am skeptical that the only answer is putting more guns in schools.  And I think the vast majority of the American people are skeptical that that somehow is going to solve our problem," Obama said. 

Obama reiterated his support for a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines that gun control advocates in Congress have said they will be pushing for

"Here's the bottom line. We're not going to get this done unless the American people decide it's important," Obama added. 

Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

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