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How Congress as a whole is more unpopular than its parts

EARLIER ON THE FIX:

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6 key moments from Wendy Davis’s filibuster

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Passion fades for President Obama among Democrats

WHAT YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED:

Low marks for Democrats, Republican in Congress. But not as low as Congress as a whole: Only 34 percent of Americans say they approve of the job Democrats in Congress are doing and 26 percent say they approve of congressional Republicans' work, according to a new Gallup poll. But that's still higher than Americans' approval of Congress overall. That number stood at 17 percent earlier this month.

Perry revives abortion debate: Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) called for a new special legislative session to begin next week in which lawmakers will consider an abortion bill that was stymied just hours earlier amid protests and a marathon filibuster by state Sen. Wendy Davis (D).

Boehner says, "We'll do our own bill": House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) told House Republicans the chamber will act on its own with regard to immigration, no matter what the Senate does. "We'll do our own bill, through regular order and it’ll be a bill that reflects the will of our majority and the people we represent,” Boehner said, according to GOP aides in the closed-door meeting.

More good news for Weiner: A second straight poll shows good news for Anthony Weiner in the New York City mayor's race. Quinnipiac University's latest survey shows him bunched up with two others at the top of the Democratic pack. The poll shows City Council Speaker Christine Quinn at 19 percent, Weiner at 17 percent and 2009 nominee Bill Thompson at 16 percent.

New GOP name in Iowa Senate race: Retired energy company CEO Mark Jacobs (R) will form an Senate exploratory committee in Iowa. Jacobs's wealth means he could self-fund if he wants to.

Duckworth take on witness at hearing: Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) sharply criticized a witness during a House hearing, slamming Braulio Castillo for claiming military disability status due to an ankle injury he suffered decades ago at a military preparatory school. “Shame on you, Mr. Castillo. Shame on you. You may not have broken any laws … but you certainly broke the trust of this great nation. You broke the trust of veterans,” Duckworth, an Iraq war veteran who lost both her legs in 2004, told him.

Gomez strategist slams GOP donors: The morning after Republican Gabriel Gomez lost the Massachusetts Senate race, one of his top advisers lashed Republican donors and groups for not helping out more. "This is a failure for all those fat cat Republican donors and establishment oriented Super PACs who complain endlessly that the Republican Party is too conservative on social issues," writes Gomez campaign consultant Curt Anderson in Politico.

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Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

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