FILE - House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., pauses during a news conference on the payroll tax cut on Capitol Hill on in this Dec. 22, 2011 file photo taken in Washington. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported early Friday Aug. 1, 2014 that Cantor says he will step down Aug. 18 to make sure constituents have a voice during the "consequential" lame-duck session. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
FILE - House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., pauses during a news conference on the payroll tax cut on Capitol Hill on in this Dec. 22, 2011 file photo taken in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Tuesday effectively ended the 2014 primary season -- and what a season it was. Actually, no, it wasn't.

No senators lost primaries, the tea party was less of a thing than in 2010 and 2012, and we didn't even really see a cohesive narrative form. It just ... was.

The four House members who actually did lose primaries tell the tale. In chronological order:

1) The oldest member of Congress

Rep. Ralph Hall (R-Tex.) is 91 years old and the last hope World War II had of staying in Congress. But he lost his primary runoff in May to former U.S. attorney John Ratcliffe.

2) The House majority leader

By far the biggest shock of the 2014 primary season, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) lost to unheralded professor David Brat in rather convincing fashion -- effectively ending a career that might have ended as House speaker.

3) The Santa Claus guy

Next to "accidental congressman" in the dictionary is a picture of Rep. Kerry Bentivolio (R-Mich.). The reindeer farmer (yes, that's a thing) and sometimes-Santa-Claus-for-hire replaced another admittedly odd character, Rep. Thaddeus McCotter (R-Mich.), after McCotter succumbed to a ballot-signatures scandal. Given all that, it was pretty much expected that Bentivolio would lose his 2014 primary. And he did.

4) Rep. John Tierney (D-Mass.)

Tierney's loss Tuesday also makes a lot of sense. After all, his wife was sentenced to a month in prison in 2011 after pleading guilty to aiding and abetting tax fraud. Her brother later implicated the congressman, which Tierney subsequently denied. It wasn't enough for Republican Richard Tisei to defeat Tierney in 2012 in a Democratic-leaning district. It was enough for Tierney to lose to Iraq veteran Seth Moulton's well-run primary challenge on Tuesday.

As you can see, the four cases above lack anything amounting to a narrative. For that, we'll have to wait for the 2016 primary season.