During his acceptance speech for Best Documentary Feature in 1975 for "Hearts and Minds," about the Vietnam War, producer Bert Schneider read a telegram from the North Vietnamese ambassador at the Paris peace talks in which he thanked Americans who had pushed to end the war. Later in the program, co-host Frank Sinatra apologized with a statement he said was from the Academy.

"We are not responsible for any political references on this program and we are sorry they had to take place this evening," he said.

They may not be responsible, but political topics pop up during Oscar acceptance speeches every few years. The winner of Best Documentary Feature is often the one to make political acceptance speeches, which makes sense since they so often deal with political issues; winners during wartime are another popular time for thing to get political.

Here's some of the most political speeches in recent Academy Awards:

  1. Abortion
    John Irving thanked Planned Parenthood and the National Abortion Rights League for his win for Best Adapted Screenplay in 2000 for "The Cider House Rules," as well as the Academy "for this honor to a film on the abortion subject," and Miramax "for having the courage to make this movie in the first place."

    Author John Irving holds his Oscar in 2000. (SCOTT NELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

    Author John Irving holds his Oscar for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Published for "The Cider House Rules" at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles 26 March 2000. (SCOTT NELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

  2. The environment
    After "The Cove" won for Best Documentary Feature, Richard O'Barry, who was featured in the documentary held up a sign reading "Text dolphin to 4414" to find out more information about an awareness campaign.
    Onstage during the 82nd Annual Academy Awards held at Kodak Theatre on March 7, 2010 in Hollywood, California.

    Onstage during the 82nd Annual Academy Awards held at Kodak Theatre on March 7, 2010, in Hollywood, California.

    Al Gore took the stage with Leonardo DiCaprio in 2007 to announce the Oscars had "gone green." "Environmentally intelligent practices have been integrated fully into every aspect of the planning and production" of the ceremony," Gore said. He also joked about possibly announcing he would run for president in 2008 before the music they play to cut off speeches that go on for too long began playing. Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" won the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature that night.

    From left, Laurie David, former Vice President Al Gore, Davis Guggenheim, Lawrence Bender, Scott Z. Burns and Lesley Chilcott accept the Oscar for best documentary feature for the film An Inconvenient Truth at the 79th Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 25, 2007, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    From left, Laurie David, former Vice President Al Gore, Davis Guggenheim, Lawrence Bender, Scott Z. Burns and Lesley Chilcott accept the Oscar for best documentary feature for the film "An Inconvenient Truth" at the 79th Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 25, 2007, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

  3. The financial crisis
    Before thanking anyone after winning Best Documentary Feature for "Inside Job" about the financial crisis, director Charles Ferguson had this to say: "Three years after a horrific financial crisis caused by massive fraud, not a single financial executive has gone to jail, and that's wrong."

    The winners of the Best Documentary Feature Inside Job, Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs address the audience the 83rd Annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre on February 27, 2011 in Hollywood, California. (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

    The winners of the Best Documentary Feature "Inside Job," Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs address the audience the 83rd Annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre on February 27, 2011 in Hollywood, California. (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

  4. Foreign affairs and war
    Jared Leto took time during his acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actor in "Dallas Buyers Club" to mention unrest in Ukraine following the Russian occupation of Crimea and in Venezuela where protesters called for the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro. "I want to say we are here and as you struggle to make your dreams happen to live the impossible, we're thinking of you tonight," he said.
    Actor Jared Leto attends the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscar Party hosted by Graydon Carter on March 2, 2014 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

    Actor Jared Leto attends the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscar Party hosted by Graydon Carter on March 2, 2014 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

    Just days after the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, Michael Moore won the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature for "Bowling for Columbine." He used his speech to criticize the war, and the audience reaction was a loud mixture of applause and boos. "We live in fictitious times," he said. "We live in a time where we have fictitious election results that elect a fictitious president. We live in a time where we have a man sending us to war for fictitious reasons. We are against this war, Mr. Bush. Shame on you."

  5. MOORE GLENN
    The winner of Best Documentary Feature the following year also criticized the Iraq War. "Forty years ago, this country went down a rabbit hole in Vietnam and millions died," "The Fog of War" director Errol Morris said. "I fear we're going down a rabbit hole once again."

    Errol Morris compares Iraq to the war in Vietnam as he accepts the Oscar for best documentary feature for the film The Fog of War during the 76th annual Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 29, 2004, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Errol Morris compares Iraq to the war in Vietnam as he accepts the Oscar for best documentary feature for the film "The Fog of War" during the 76th annual Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 29, 2004, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

  6. Immigration
    The phrase "illegal immigrant" was still OK by the Associated Press when Natalie Portman opted instead to use "undocumented immigrant" when talking about the role Best Actor nominee Demian Bichir played in the film "A Better Life" at the 2012 Oscars.

    onstage during the 84th Annual Academy Awards held at the Hollywood & Highland Center on February 26, 2012 in Hollywood, California.

    Natalie Portman onstage during the 84th Annual Academy Awards held at the Hollywood & Highland Center on February 26, 2012 in Hollywood, California.

  7. LGBT rights
    Sean Penn, who won Best Actor for his portrayal of gay activist Harvey Milk in 2009, said those who voted for Proposition 8 in California should "sit and reflect and anticipate their great shame and the shame in their grandchildren's eyes if they continue that way of support." "We've got to have equal rights for everyone," he said.
    Sean Penn during the 81st Annual Academy Awards held at Kodak Theatre on February 22, 2009 in Los Angeles, California.

    Sean Penn during the 81st Annual Academy Awards held at Kodak Theatre on February 22, 2009 in Los Angeles, California.

    Dustin Lance Black also won an Oscar for "Milk" in 2009, for ,Best Original Screenplay. "I promise you you will have equal rights federally across this great nation of ours," he said.

    Winner for Best Original Screenplay Dustin Lance Black for Milk gives his acceptance speech as actor Steve Martin and Tina Fey (L) watch at the 81st Academy Awards at the Kodak Theater in Hollywood, California on February 22, 2009. (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

    Winner for Best Original Screenplay Dustin Lance Black for "Milk" gives his acceptance speech as actor Steve Martin and Tina Fey (L) watch at the 81st Academy Awards at the Kodak Theater in Hollywood, California on February 22, 2009. (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

  8. Michael Dukakis
    Olympia Dukakis, the cousin of Michael Dukakis, endorsed him after winning the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for "Moonstruck" in 1987, yelling, "OK, Michael, let's go!" He would be nominated by the Democratic Party 16 months later.

    Olympia Dukakis holds her Oscar high April 11, 1988, as she stands backstage at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angles after being honored at the 60th Academy Awards as best supporting actress for her role in Moonstrck. (AP photo/Lennox Mcleondon/stf)

    Olympia Dukakis holds her Oscar high April 11, 1988, as she stands backstage at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angles after being honored at the 60th Academy Awards as best supporting actress for her role in "Moonstrck." (AP photo/Lennox Mcleondon/stf)

  9. Treatment of Native Americans
    Marlon Brando declined to accept his award for Best Actor for his role in "The Godfather" at the 1973 Oscars and instead sent Sacheen Littlefeather, president of the of National Native American Affirmative Image Committee because of, "the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television and movie reruns," she said, and a siege at Wounded Knee, S.D. involving Native American activists and law enforcement.
  1. Race
    "This moment is so much bigger than me," Halle Berry said when she became the first black woman to win the Oscar for Best Actress in 2002 for her role in "Monster's Ball." She said the win was for other black actresses and "every nameless faceless woman of color that now has a chance because this door tonight has been opened."

    Actress Halle Berry puts her hand up after getting the signal to cut her speech off while accepting her award for best actress during the 74th annual Academy Awards Sunday, March 24, 2002, in Los Angeles. Berry won for her work in Monster's Ball. Berry is the first African-American woman to win a best actress Oscar. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)

    Actress Halle Berry puts her hand up after getting the signal to cut her speech off while accepting her award for best actress during the 74th annual Academy Awards Sunday, March 24, 2002, in Los Angeles. Berry won for her work in "Monster's Ball." Berry is the first African-American woman to win a best actress Oscar. When given the queue to wrap up her acceptance speech, Berry protested, "This is 74 years here; I've got to take this time." (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)