When it comes to campaign cash, Ted Cruz is doing quite well.

He has more money in the bank than any other GOP presidential candidate right now, and his network of super PACs has boosted him to second, behind only to former Florida governor Jeb Bush, in his party's overall presidential money race.

But sometimes too much of a good thing is too much of a good thing.

Case in point: The Washington Post's Katie Zezima reports that one of Cruz's super PACs thinks the other, main Cruz-allied super PAC, isn't serving his candidacy well. So it's stepping in with its own ideas, and what it came up with could cause trouble for Cruz himself.

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The pro-Cruz ads posted so far by Cruz's main super PAC, Keep the Promise I, funded by hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, are "boring" and risk making Cruz look "wimpy," said a consultant for Cruz super PAC No. 2, the Courageous Conservatives PAC.

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So Courageous Conservatives created a 60-second radio ad geared toward conservative talk shows in Iowa. It slams Cruz's fellow senator and 2016 opponent, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), for his missed votes in the Senate in pretty blunt language:

"We all loved how Marco Rubio took apart Jeb Bush in the debate. Wasn’t it great? But what’s Rubio ever done? Anything? Other than his gang of eight amnesty bill, can anyone think of anything Marco Rubio's ever done?" the ad said. "Anything at all besides amnesty? Marco Rubio looks good on TV, but that’s about it."

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Cruz is a bold campaigner, but he's shown no indication that attacking Rubio this directly this early on is anywhere in his playbook. That's not to say he necessarily disagrees with the strategy of attacking Rubio -- we don't know yet -- but generally super PACs will take their cues based on what candidates have said or done publicly. This one clearly doesn't.

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Unfortunately for Cruz, he doesn't get to decide what super PACS air on his behalf. According to campaign finance law, candidates can't coordinate directly with the super PACS supporting them, especially about strategy.

Campaigns have found many ways around this, but the essential fact remains that they can't control what their allied outside groups do. If a super PAC wants to jump 10 steps ahead of the campaign, then a super PAC is going to do just that. Cruz can publicly raise concerns in a wink-wink, nudge-nudge sort of way, but the super PAC doesn't have to listen. And politically inconvenient ads are one of the most prominent ways a ostensibly well-meaning super PAC could throw a wrench into a campaign.

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That's terrifying for the campaigns. Giving up control of their carefully crafted strategies is one of the scariest scenarios possible for control-obsessed campaign managers. But that's exactly what they're doing by essentially outsourcing their campaigning to outside groups. Close to 62 percent of the money raised on the GOP side so far has been from super PACs and other independent groups, report The Washington Post's Matea Gold and Anu Narayanswamy.

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Cruz, who isn't the first and won't be the last candidate to struggle with this, falls well within that trend. He has raised $26.5 million according to third-quarter fundraising totals announced in October, while his allied super PACs and other outside groups have raised $38 million so far.

Those are fundraising numbers that would make any other GOP candidate jealous. But the very same grass-roots support that is fueling his strong fundraising has meant there are multiple outside groups supporting him and now offering very different messages. And there is such a thing as too many cooks in the kitchen.

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