Donald Trump's comments on immigration have been replayed around the world.

In Mexico, current and former leaders tore into Trump, with former president Vicente Fox saying, "I'm not going to pay for that [expletive] wall!" In Saudi Arabia, Walid bin Talal, a member of the royal family, tweeted that Trump is "a disgrace not only to the GOP but to all America." In Britain, Prime Minister David Cameron called Trump's rhetoric "divisive, stupid and wrong.”

Then there's Argentina, where a television broadcaster just released this video.

For those who don't speak Spanish, the tweet essentially says, "The best that you can do is not let us enter."

The ad, featuring Trump comments and footage from debates earlier in the 2016 cycle, is intended not to get people riled up about his immigration policies, but rather to get fans hyped about the Argentine soccer team.

And it works. Well.

"These are not the nice, sweet little people you think," Trump's voice intones as the video shows Lionel Messi, the diminutive playmaker who is widely considered the best player in the world (pipe down, Ronaldo fans).

"They are totally taking advantage of us," Trump goes on to say, as footage shows striker Sergio Agüero dribbling past helpless defenders.

Then Trump's most famous refrain, talking about the "wall," is played. (Fix Managing Editor Aaron Blake, unfortunately a Liverpool fan, points out that the commercial's producers missed a chance to show the Argentina players forming a wall to defend a free kick. Pull it together, Argentine commercial video editors!)

Trump is all about "winning," and part of that winning strategy is arguing for stronger border security. But maybe this is Argentina's way of taking Trump's comments and turning them on their head, saying, "At least in soccer, you're right: We'll beat you."

Update: Several readers have written in to clarify that in Spanish, the soccer move called the "wall" involves one player passing to another, then quickly receiving a return pass – as if hitting the ball against a wall. Spanish-speakers use a different word for what American fans might call a "wall," when players line up side-by-side to block a free kick. In Spanish, that wall is referred to as a "barrier."