Texas Supreme Court Justice Don Willett was recognized for his social-media skills in 2015, earning the only-in-Texas title of "Tweeter Laureate." In perfect form, he took to Twitter, saying: "Let joy reign unconfined!"

"I'm the most avid judicial tweeter in America, which is like being the tallest Munchkin in Oz," Willett told the Associated Press at the time.

Willett, a Republican who tweets as @JusticeWillett, has some 36,000 followers who get a steady stream of Internet memes, inspirational quotes, photos of his family and, of course, the judge's dreaded dad jokes.

They also see his comical jabs at various candidates ...

... including the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

https://twitter.com/JusticeWillett/status/717182475999453184

https://twitter.com/JusticeWillett/status/711241141769777152

As Mediaite noted after Trump released a list of his potential Supreme Court nominees, Willett has taken particular aim at Trump University — the disgraced and now-defunct real estate school.

Trump's list includes 11 judges that he says he would consider nominating to the U.S. Supreme Court to take Antonin Scalia's seat.

Five of the potential nominees — including Willett — are on state Supreme Courts. The rest serve on U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals.

Trump first promised to release the list in March, when Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) accused him of not being a true conservative and warned Republicans that Trump would appoint liberal judges to the court. At the time, Trump said he was working with the Heritage Foundation to formulate a list of potential nominees — and that if elected president, he would pick only from that list.

Willett was named "Tweeter Laureate of the 84th Texas Legislature" last May by state Rep. Tony Dale.

Another state lawmaker, Rep. Ken Sheets, told the Associated Press last year that social media could be used "as a medium of communication between us and the people of Texas."

But Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, a watchdog group in Washington D.C., has called it "silliness."

"The more you tweet," he told the Associated Press, "the more likely you are to make a mistake tweeting.”