Debbie Wasserman Schultz. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

It's been a hell of a two weeks for Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the now-former head of the Democratic National Committee.

Two weeks ago, she was forced to announce she would resign from her post after the party's national convention in Philadelphia following the release of a trove of hacked emails that suggested the DNC was short of neutral in the primary fight between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

That won her the Worst Week in Washington last week.

Little did she know it would get worse not better.

On Monday Wasserman Schultz showed up in Philadelphia to address a Florida Democratic delegation breakfast.  Then this happened.

I've covered politics for a long time. That is one of the most painful moments I have ever witnessed.

In the wake of that debacle, Hillary Clinton and her campaign began scrambling to keep Wasserman Schultz off the main convention stage. (As DNC Chair, Wasserman Schultz was expected to gavel the convention in -- and out -- as well as run the roll call of the states.)

Within hours it was announced that Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake, the DNC Secretary, would take over Wasserman Schultz's convention duties -- a move that would keep the Floridian entirely in the background of a gathering that was seen as recently as a few weeks ago as her crowning achievement.

Rumors swirled that Wasserman Schultz was headed back to Florida. She wound up staying for the week but was a total non-entity at the convention. Despite keeping a low profile, she had to weather a Politico story about her time as head of the DNC that cast her as a overly ambitious and deeply selfish, someone who had burned virtually every bridge she had ever built.

Wasserman Schultz's problems at the national level also raise questions about how strong she is in her home district.  She faces a challenge from Tim Canova, a Sanders-backed candidate who has raised considerable cash due to his ties into the Vermont Senator's political network. The primary is August 30.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz, for realizing last week was only a preview of how far you had to fall, you had the Worst Week in Washington. Congrats, or something.