Nebraska State Sen. Bill Kintner stood before reporters on Wednesday morning and called himself a “fighter.”

Kintner, who had previously been involved in a cybersex scandal, this month drew criticism for an offensive retweet about the Women's March, which appeared to joke about the issue of sexual assault. At the news conference, Kintner, a Republican, said that he had received emails, calls and text messages asking him to stay and continue his work in the state government.

“Well, as much as my heart says to fight, my head says it is time to step away from the legislature,” he said. “It is no secret to anyone who knows me that there have been many disappointing and frustrating times in my over-four years in the legislature.”

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Then he continued: “I have concluded that it is wise to step down as a member of the Nebraska legislature.”

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Kintner announced his resignation, stating that it would be effective Jan. 30.

“To paraphrase Richard Nixon, you won't have Bill Kintner to kick around anymore,” he said toward the end of his comments.

In its report, the Associated Press described Kintner as a “Nebraska state legislator known for his blunt, occasionally offensive manner.” The Omaha World-Herald, which posted a video and transcript of his remarks, reported that his resignation came after “months of criticism from lawmakers, constituents and Gov. Pete Ricketts.”

“I hesitate to resign as I know my resignation will be hailed as a victory to the progressive liberal movement,” Kintner said at the news conference. “But this is not about justice or doing what’s right. This is the old adage that might makes right. You have the votes, you can do what you want.”

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The World-Herald reports that Kintner's announcement on Wednesday morning came shortly before a planned motion on whether to expel him. Via the World-Herald:

Speaker of the Legislature Jim Scheer said he met with Kintner last night and had “a very candid conversation.” Kintner delivered his letter of resignation Wednesday morning, Scheer said. At the same time, he asked Scheer to join him at the news conference.
“I appreciate Bill stepping and removing himself from the body,” Scheer said, adding that his action likely took more courage than staying and fighting. “He did the body a favor. He did the state a favor.”

The Associated Press reports that Kintner was previously fined $1,000 after admitting to “engaging in mutual masturbation in July 2015 with a woman using Skype, an online video-chatting service.” He used a state computer, according to AP.

More recently, Kintner drew criticism for a retweet to his Twitter timeline, according to reports. The World-Herald, which has posted an image of the retweet, reported that it showed three women who appeared to be carrying signs in a women's march. The signs referenced a recorded 2005 conversation in which President Trump made inappropriate comments about women.

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Above the picture, a person who posted the initial tweet wrote: “Ladies, I think you’re safe.”

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The AP reported that Kintner's office later said in a statement that the lawmaker took down the retweet as soon as he “became aware that it was being misconstrued.”

“By retweeting a message, I was not implying support for putting women in fear of their personal safety,” the statement said, according to AP.

Kintner was not the only lawmaker to face criticism for social media posts in the wake of the marches in D.C. and other cities Saturday.

That group also includes Indiana state Rep. Jim Lucas, who, according to AP, displayed on Facebook a picture that “showed a photo of a woman sprayed in the face with pepper spray with a caption that read: ‘PARTICIPATION TROPHIES. NOW IN LIQUID FORM.’ ”

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The AP reported that Indiana state Sen. Jack Sandlin also drew criticism for a post on his social media account, which reportedly mocked those who attended the marches.

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Both Sandlin and Lucas are Republicans. The Indianapolis Star reported that Sandlin took down the post and wrote a message on Facebook that said: “Apparently there is an offensive post on Facebook that's attributed to me about women in Washington marching.

“Not sure how that ended up on my Facebook wall, but that certainly does not reflect my opinion of women,” he wrote, according to the newspaper. “People who know me will know that's not my view.”

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Sandlin told the Star that he believes someone else posted the initial meme, which appears to be shared from another account, to his Facebook wall.

“I don't believe that I put it there,” Sandlin said, when questioned by the Star. “There's always an outside chance that I could have hit something. I know others that have had stuff show up on their Facebook wall as well.”

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Lucas took down the post, the Star reported.

“I can guarantee that’s not going to happen again,” Lucas told the newspaper. “My posts moving forward are going to be a little more filtered in light of this situation.”

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