President Trump was reportedly bothered by Melissa McCarthy's portrayal of Sean Spicer a week ago on "Saturday Night Live." Not so much because it was over-the-top, mind you, but because a woman played Spicer.

Politico reported that "it was Spicer’s portrayal by a woman that was most problematic in the president’s eyes, according to sources close to him."

SNL's response to that? Have more women play members of Trump's team — and even Trump himself.

This week's reprise of its Spicer news briefing sketch, as Elahe Izadi notes, features Kate McKinnon playing Attorney General Jeff Sessions. And later in the show is a prerecorded sketch about Leslie Jones's desire to be SNL's long-term Trump impersonator when Alec Baldwin isn't available.

After she doesn't get the job and flips out on the show's creator, Lorne Michaels, Jones is seen exiting the building when she happens upon another female cast member in full Trump makeup: Vanessa Bayer.


(Image from YouTube)

The Spicer sketch also includes another not-so-subtle dig at Trump's apparent concern over a woman playing his press secretary. While complaining about Nordstrom having canceled Ivanka Trump's line, McCarthy-as-Spicer shows off his Ivanka Trump shoes — high heels.


(Image from YouTube)

And after the show, McCarthy seemed to have some more fun with her portrayal as Spicer, Instagramming herself kissing her husband while still in full Spicer makeup.

That's a Spicey kiss! @benjyfalcone

A post shared by Melissa McCarthy (@melissamccarthy) on

It's easy to see what's going on here. If anybody knows how easy it can be to troll Trump, it's SNL. It has been lampooning him for decades. Its oafish portrayal of candidate and President Trump practically begs for a Trump tweet. And sometimes he obliges.

In which case, everybody wins: Trump has a comedy show full of elite liberals to rag on, and SNL gets under the skin of the president of the United States.

Alec Baldwin's impression of President Trump has become a hallmark of this season of "Saturday Night Live," but it was Kate McKinnon's wide variety of political roles that stole the Feb. 11 episode. (Nicki DeMarco/The Washington Post)