President Trump must have enjoyed his executive time Friday morning.

On “Fox & Friends,” where the president made an appearance by phone a day earlier, the hosts heaped credit on Trump for catalyzing a new agreement by North and South Korea to denuclearize their peninsula and seek an official end to the Korean War.

Citing Trump's pejorative nickname for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, “Little Rocket Man,” Steve Doocy told viewers “the unpredictable nature of Donald Trump really, kind of, is what has brought us to this stage.”

“I think China’s played a huge role in this, as well, and the president doesn’t get enough credit for pushing China,” Abby Huntsman added.

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Such praise was to be expected on Trump's favorite morning show, but it was not confined to Fox.

On CNN's “New Day,” co-host Alisyn Camerota noted that South Korean foreign minister Kang Kyung-wha had said, “Clearly, credit goes to President Trump.”

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New York Times reporter David Sanger, a CNN contributor, replied: “I think there’s a big element of truth to that. I think that President Trump definitely deserves much of the credit for the fact that his threats — which worried the whole world and worried all of us at the time that he did it — I think did break the ice here and probably so concerned Kim Jong Un that he felt he needed to do something.”

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On MSNBC's “Morning Joe,” one of the president's sharpest critics, Joe Scarborough, questioned whether Trump had acted strategically but said Trump deserves credit, nevertheless.

“This is a remarkable moment, and it’s a moment that you can’t help but believe was brought about by some of that disruption in the White House that we’ve been talking about for quite some time,” Scarborough said. “Maybe it was the unintended consequences of Donald Trump seeming to be unbalanced, but, whatever the case, North and South Korea started talking, and we saw a historic handshake yesterday and a visit to South Korea from Kim Jong Un.”

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“Is this a feather in the cap for Donald Trump?” Gayle King asked on “CBS This Morning.”

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Former CIA deputy director Michael Morrell, a CBS analyst, answered: “I think the president deserves credit for getting us this far. No president has put as much pressure on North Korea as Donald Trump has, and that's a good thing.”

Trump has collected kudos throughout the easing of tensions on the Korean Peninsula in recent months, but Friday marked a high point, as he received praise up and down the dial. It was the sort of news coverage Trump craves, in general, and on North Korean diplomacy in particular.

He told the Associated Press last year that when he was elected, he thought that “now I'll get good press.”

“I thought the press would become better, and it, actually, in my opinion, got more nasty,” Trump lamented.

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Axios's Jonathan Swan reported last week Trump “views the North Korean crisis as his 'great man' of history moment.”

New York magazine's Eric Levitz followed up by writing the president's ambition had begun to “look a bit more plausible.” Levitz added that “when it comes to forging a peace deal with North Korea, Trump’s aversion to sweating the details of geopolitics could be an asset. And his disagreeable (and/or sociopathic) personality could prove less detrimental to negotiations than his egotism and susceptibility to flattery are beneficial to them.”

Some of the media's back-patting is also backhanded, to be sure. Still, in North Korean peace talks, Trump has an opportunity to earn the coverage he has always wanted.

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