Less than three months after a local judge ruled it was A-OK to take upskirt photos of women at the Lincoln Memorial, D.C. has been visited by a new and equally creepy voyeur.

His name, or at least his online handle, is DonkCam1. And by the looks of his uploads on xHamster.com — a sort of user-generated YouTube for porn — he prowls the D.C. Metro system, shooting short cellphone videos of unsuspecting women, largely young teenagers, as they ride the train.

Some of his videos, which bear charming titles like “voyeurism,” “sluts” and “yes teens,” have been viewed more than 13,000 times on Xhamster. (The clips have also been uploaded to a series of other porn sites.) Most are not explicit or “upskirt,” as such, but the focus on the women’s private areas — and the fact that they don’t know he is filming — still makes the collection pretty skin-crawly. The latest clip was posted eight days ago.

The discovery of DonkCam, which began with an e-mail to the local blog PoPville, has prompted a minor panic in certain digital D.C. circles. On Reddit, locals urged witnesses to call Metro’s transit police; on Twitter, one man told his followers to be “on guard!” for the creep. On Tuesday, Metro spokeswoman Caroline Laurin told the Post that the agency found the videos “disturbing” and that transit detectives are “aware of the matter and are investigating.”

Few people seem to realize, alas, that DonkCam isn’t one specific guy you should watch out for. The fact that everyone has a smartphone in his pocket means that everyone can also be an amateur pornographer.

And on D.C.’s Metro, New York’s subway, and places far afield, the creepshot industry is positively booming: There are at least a dozen porn sites dedicated solely to upskirt photos and their ilk, to say nothing of the myriad Twitter feeds, forums and more generalist porn sites that host the stuff. For a good argument against ever going out in public, try searching the phrase “creepshot” on Twitter: the photos come from grocery stores, yoga classes, beaches — and yes, many, many subway platforms.

“Waiting for the train Saturday Afternoon when I spied a 40 odd year old black male … [taking] pictures of other women on the metro platform,” one poster warned on a D.C. forum in late October. “This kind of person exists on the metro people — keep an eye out for him.”

Keeping an eye out is, for better or worse, usually the most people can do. Taking a photo of an exposed thing in a public place is entirely legal, no matter how unsavory the intentions of the photographer.

That’s why, in October, a D.C. judge acquitted a man who took photos of women at the Lincoln Memorial as they sat on the steps. And in late September, a Texas court ruled that state’s ban on creepshots unconstitutional under the First Amendment. One law professor told the Houston Chronicle that it was “hard to see” how a state could ever make taking a picture illegal.

In other words, it’s not necessarily that the law hasn’t caught up to the technology, as is often the issue in these types of cases. It’s that, possibly, the law may just not be able to do very much. (Metro is encouraging riders to report any and all harassment to transit police, anyway.)

Where does that leave the innocent patrons of D.C.’s Metro system — and literally anyone else who ever goes outside? In lieu of a legal solution, some critics have gone vigilante, shaming creep photographers IRL or posting their photos to Twitter. One man, writing on DonkCam’s xHamster page, has already promised to find him and beat him up.

Until that happy day, the concerned women of D.C. might want to consider some preventative measures, such as cabbing absolutely everywhere or donning head-to-toe coverings every time they leave the house.

… is it 2015 yet?