• U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit: Cop who shot and killed an innocent man in his own home due to the cop’s own mistakes is still protected by qualified immunity. The details of the case are even worse than the summary.
  • Minnesota judge issues warrant for anyone who Googled the name of a victim of identity fraud. That would seem to set a troubling precedent — and be a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment’s specificity requirement.
  • Your latest crime lab scandal comes courtesy of the Orlando area and may affect up to 2,500 cases. Law enforcement apparently knew about the problem and hid it from defense attorneys.
  • The Miami-Dade prison guards who allegedly laughed as they scalded a man to death in a hot shower … won’t face criminal charges.
  • Why do immigrants seem to be committing more crimes? Because we’ve vastly broadened the definition of the word “criminal.”
  • Here’s a good example of an appropriate use of SWAT tactics. We should praise law enforcement when they go out of their way to preserve human life.
  • Changing the evidentiary standard for a conviction from “beyond a reasonable doubt” to “a preponderance of the evidence” — as the federal government has encouraged colleges and universities to do in administrative sexual assault hearings — significantly increases the frequency with which innocent people are convicted.
  • Florida prosecutor refuses to seek death penalty in a murder case. So Florida Gov. Rick Scott removed the prosecutor from the case and assigned a special prosecutor who will seek death.
  • The FBI has turned into America’s sex-policing vice squad.
  • Fascinating article on using Freedom of Information Act requests on the recently deceased to expose the extent of the federal government’s spying and surveillance.
  • Tweet of the day. I wonder if the GOP will extend this requirement to others who get government benefits; think corporate tax breaks, mortgage deductions, farm subsidies . . . or members of Congress?