(Pete Souza/The White House)

This is a photo of President Obama meeting with Ebola survivor Kent Brantly in the Oval Office.

It may seem like a nondescript and fairly routine presidential meeting, but it was intended to send a strong message: That Brantly is completely Ebola-free, and that it is safe to interact with survivors of the deadly virus.

There is still plenty of concern and hysteria surrounding the treatment of American patients with Ebola at U.S. facilities. Brantly is just one of four people who have been or currently are being treated at U.S. hospitals; as a survivor, he is now free of the virus and immune to the strain of Ebola that's currently ravaging several countries in West Africa.

That Obama is willing to sit in a room with Brantly demonstrates that the leader of the free world believes those concerns have no basis.

"I had a chance to see Dr. Brantly in the Oval Office this morning," Obama said Tuesday afternoon at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. "And although he is still having to gain back some weight, he looks great, he looks strong and we are incredibly grateful to him and his family for the service he has rendered to people who are a lot less lucky than all of us."

Brantly and his wife Amber met with the president ahead of Brantly's testimony before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and before Obama left for the CDC. News reporters and photographers were not permitted in the meeting.

Perhaps the only more powerful image might have been a handshake.

[This post has been updated.]

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