Domino’s Pizza announced Monday that it has been helping pay for road repairs in four U.S. municipalities as part of its Paving for Pizza campaign. (Domino’s Pizza images)
Reporter

Domino’s Pizza has added a new topping to its menu: asphalt.

The Michigan-based pizza franchiser announced Monday that it has begun to help pay for road repairs in four municipalities and would consider offering similar assistance to others based on nominations from customers.

“Potholes, cracks and bumps in the road can cause irreversible damage to your pizza during the drive home from Domino’s,” the company says on its website. The campaign, Paving for Pizza,  is already at work in Athens, Ga.; Bartonville, Tex.; Burbank, Calif.; and Milford, Del. The company says providing infrastructure grants is its way of “saving pizza, one pothole at a time.”


One might argue that it’s a little late for saving mass-produced pizza, and rough roads are not the main problem afflicting such pies, but municipal officials who got the dough sounded thankful.

“This unique, innovative partnership allowed the town of Bartonville to accomplish more pothole repairs,” Mayor Bill Scherer was quoted by Domino’s as saying.

Jalopnik, a website covering automobiles and other forms of transportation, was among those that found the campaign distasteful, however. The promotion is less emblematic of corporate philanthropy than “something from a William Gibson cyberpunk dystopia novel, where the government has become so weak and useless, private corporations have been taking over the basic upkeep of the nation,” Jalopnik said.

In fact, some private corporations — and at least one foreign government — have been offering to pay for things such as keeping public subways open past closing time for special events.

People who want to nominate their home towns for a slice of the Domino’s road funds can do so by going to pavingforpizza.com and entering their Zip code.

This post has been updated to correct Mayor Scherer’s name.

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