The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral argument in King v. Burwell on March 4. Between now and then, I’ll be speaking on several panels to discuss the case.

On Monday, Feb. 23, I’ll be speaking on a noontime Heritage Foundation panel, King v. Burwell: Why the IRS Obamacare Handouts Should Lose at the Supreme Court”, with Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and the Heritage Foundation’s Edmund Haislmaier.

On Thursday, Feb. 26, I’ll be back in D.C. for a Federalist Society panel at the National Press Club: “King v. Burwell: U.S. Supreme Court Preview of the Next Challenge to the Affordable Care Act.” Other panelists include Carrie Severino of the Judicial Crisis Network, Robert Weiner of Arnold & Porter, and Simon Lazarus of the Constitutional Accountability Center. Both Weiner and Lazarus worked on amicus briefs supporting the government’s position in King, so this panel should produce a vigorous debate.

On Monday, March 2, I’ll be debating King with Prof. Eric Segall of Georgia State University at the University of Pennsylvania School of Law. This debate is co-sponsored by the Penn Law chapters of the American Constitution Society, Federalist Society and the Univeristy of Pennsylvania Law Review. Prof. Segall and I are also crossing swords on King in the law review’s online supplement. Prof. Segall’s opening entry is available here. My response should be posted early next week.

Meanwhile, the King plaintiffs filed their reply brief on Wednesday. All of the briefs are available here. Additional supplemental material may be found here.

UPDATE: For those who can’t get enough of King v. Burwell, the American Enterprise Institute is also hosting a panel on the legal and policy aspects of the case on Monday, February 23. Details here.

For those who want post-argument analysis of King, I’ll be on a panel discussing the case at a symposium on The Affordable Care Act in 2015, at the NYU School of Law, on Tuesday, March 10. Other panelists will include Profs. Nicholas Bagley, Tim Jost, and Cato’s Michael Cannon. The conference is sponsored by NYU’s Classical Liberal Institute and the NYU Journal of Law & Liberty, which will also publish papers form the conference.