With law school applications down and a number of law schools struggling, there has been speculation about whether or how many schools might close. William Mitchell and Hamline recently announced their merger, which amounts to an indirect shutdown of one. Now news reports suggest that the Charleston School of Law may be about to start the process of shutting down:

The Charleston School of Law may not accept a class of first-year students in the fall, according to a statement from the school’s two remaining co-founders.

Retired judges Robert Carr and George Kosko spoke to faculty and staff members today about the school’s future.

“We cannot in good faith enroll another class when, like last year, the school is spending more money than is coming in; when we cannot assure the students that they will be able to use federal student loans for their full three years; and when we cannot be sure the school will be able to maintain its license and stay open,” Carr and Kosko said in a joint statement. The two added that they are heartbroken over the situation. . . .

A formal announcement is expected next week.

It’s not a formal announcement, but it’s not a good sign either. The Post and Courier explains:

American Bar Association and state rules prohibit the school from simply closing its doors. If the board decides to close the school, it would have to submit a “teach-out” plan that details how students who already are enrolled would finish their education programs.

Hat tip: JDU.