(Here is the latest edition of the Institute for Justice’s weekly Short Circuit newsletter, written by John Ross.)

While the U.S. Supreme Court has endorsed the use of the takings power for private development, the vast majority of state courts that have examined the issue have rejected the Supremes’ expansive definition of “public use.” Today, for instance, a New Jersey judge rejected casino officials’ petition to seize a piano tuner’s longtime family home in Atlantic City. Read more here.
And then click here to read an IJ amicus brief urging a Louisiana appeals court to block a plan to seize an industrial port facility along the Mississippi River so that another private party can operate it.
In June, the Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology forced beauty-salon owner Lata Jagtiani to fire her salon’s most experienced eyebrow threaders (who use cotton string to remove unwanted hair quickly and safely (and inexpensively)). Because of public complaints or shoddy workmanship? Not at all. Instead, the threaders had not completed the 750 hours of training required to become licensed estheticians. And for good reason! None of the training has anything to do with threading. This week, Lata and two of her former threaders joined with IJ to challenge the state’s irrational rules for eyebrow threading. Read more about the case here.
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