A basket full of warm, buttery, flaky biscuits is within your reach. Simply eating them fresh out of the oven is a treat in and of itself. Or slather with butter and jam. Or make your best breakfast sandwich yet. So many options here.

As for the recipe to help you reach peak biscuit, it can help to think about what you typically have in your refrigerator. Buttermilk is a biscuit staple and lasts a long time, but yogurt thinned with milk can be used in a pinch. We’ve also included a recipe that just uses milk, and another that employs sour cream and milk, which approximates buttermilk but with an even more pronounced flavor.

Whatever biscuit you settle on, you have options in baking them: Try a few, freeze some pre-cut dough for later, or bake them all and take comfort in cracking open a steaming hot mound of bread. Here are some highlights from our archives:

Charlotte Jenkins’s Biscuits, above. Instead of buttermilk, sour cream adds a tangy dimension in this recipe. Self-rising flour is available at most grocery stores. It usually is made with a lower protein flour, but you can use regular all-purpose, adding 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon salt per 1 cup of flour. You may need to add a little more liquid to compensate for the higher protein, and the biscuits may not be quite as tender.



(Dixie D. Vereen for The Washington Post)

Buttermilk Biscuits With Double Ginger Butter. Using the large shredding holes on your box grater to break up the butter makes it easy to incorporate. Folding the dough also gives you wonderful layers and flakiness. Even if you don’t feel like putting together the ginger butter, these will still be great.



(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

Rosemary BiscuitsIf you’d rather not deal with butter, these herb-flecked bites use vegetable shortening. They’re the perfect thing to put out in a bread basket for dinner.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Cornmeal and Cranberry Drop BiscuitsStone-ground yellow cornmeal adds a lovely texture. The dough is simply dropped onto baking sheets, so there’s no dealing with biscuit cutters.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Pimento Cheese BiscuitsWith sharp cheddar, pimento peppers and onions mixed right into the dough. If you wanted to double up and spread pimento cheese on top, we’re not going to judge you. Don’t sweat if you can’t find pimento peppers, because roasted red peppers work fine, too.



(T. Susan Chang)

Angel Biscuits With Bay Brown Butter. These are folded into half-moons, which puff up dramatically during baking, helped in part by the inclusion of yeast. They’re a bit more involved than a traditional biscuit, but don’t let that deter you from a wonderful end result.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Goat Butter Biscuits. Creamy, rich and tangy. Wegmans and Whole Foods carry goat’s-milk butter, which may end up becoming your new spread of choice once you try it.

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