Can you have too many recipes for quick soups? The correct answer is no. So in the interest of flannel shirts, decorative gourds and every other autumnal cliche, here’s a selection of soup recipes to try this season.

Each recipe comes together in under an hour and most make enough soup to guarantee leftovers, since the second best thing about eating a steaming hot bowl of soup is knowing that you have more on hand to warm up for lunch or dinner another day.

Family Favorite Minestrone, above. This is a favorite in part because of just how versatile it is. When we made it recently, we didn’t have small red beans or elbow pasta on hand, so we used kidney beans and orecchiette instead. You could also change-up the herbs and vegetables if you like.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post)

Fast Blender Tomato Soup With Cheese Crisps. Almost as easy as simply opening a can of tomato soup, but infinitely better than that. Blend a little oil, garlic, onion, bread chunks, canned tomatoes, broth and dried herbs, then cook the mixture for about 20 minutes in a saucepan. That’s it.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Corn and Hominy Chowder. A slew of freezer and pantry staples combine their powers in this hearty soup. Serve it with corn bread slathered in honey butter.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Stracciatella With Spinach (Egg Drop Soup). Soup needn’t be hefty to be satisfying. This one features a broth full of spinach with eggs swirled in and a bit of Parmigiano-Reggiano sprinkled on top. Serve with crusty bread.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Spiced Carrot, Leek and Lentil Soup. Onion, leeks and carrots get friendly with plenty of spices and a good amount of red lentils to create a soup that can be served chunky or pureed.



(Scott Suchman for The Washington Post)

Tami’s French Fry Soup. When we first published this recipe, we got several responses that were essentially “Ha-ha, leftover french fries, what are those?” While we appreciate your cleverness, we are here to tell you that sometimes you get bad french fries — and sometimes you can’t eat all of your fries even if they’re good. (And also waste not, want not, my friends.) Use this recipe as a template to turn any roasted starchy root or tuber — sweet potatoes, carrots, winter squash, etc. — into a soothing, smooth soup. The ketchup topping is optional, but it does add a nice sweet and acidic contrast.

More from Voraciously:

Ketchup is so much more than a condiment, and it calls for celebration

Will mushrooms work instead of zucchini? How to swap ingredients with confidence.

How to spice up your food — and your life! — with your own custom spice blend