Yes, you’ve done it! You’ve survived another Thanksgiving! Now it’s time to tackle all those leftovers.

You already know how to make your favorite Thanksgiving leftovers sandwich, so we’re going to talk about all the other great options on the table. And we’re not leaving a drop of cranberry sauce behind.

Pumpkin Cranberry Waffles, above. Let’s start with breakfast. If you’ve got some pumpkin puree leftover from that pie, here’s where to use it. Skip the step of adding cranberries to the batter, and just top these tasty waffles with some of that leftover cranberry sauce. Pro-tip: Instead of making waffles from scratch, you can squish leftover stuffing into a waffle iron and ta-da! Savory stuffing waffle. Which, technically, you could also use as the bread of a sandwich.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Turkey Tortilla Soup, above. This comes together in about 20 minutes, start to finish, and is ideal for not only using turkey and turkey broth leftovers, but also ridding your pantry of other lingering canned goods, such as enchilada sauce. If you don’t have the garnishes, feel free to top the soup with other leftovers — roasted Brussels sprouts and a dollop of gravy mixed with sour cream could stand in for the tomatoes and cheese, for example.

Other soups that’d take well to leftovers: Pumpkin Chicken Chili (with turkey instead of chicken, of course); Creamy Greek Noodle SoupCorn and Hominy Chowder. Make sure to keep your turkey bones to make stock!



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Turkey Tonnato. If you’re tired of hot and heavy food, tonnato is the way to go. With a no-cook sauce and leftover turkey breast, this easy meal whips together quick. Serve it atop some crusty bread and you’re good to go!

Beyond the simple tonnato, we’d use leftover turkey in pizza, tacos, baked potatoesrice paper or wonton wrapperscrepes, pasta or rice. (These bases would also serve as ideal landing spots for other leftovers, such as greens or salads.)



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post)

Anytime Frittata. Frittatas are one of the most forgiving foods. You can really mix in just about anything from your leftovers pile, provided not too much liquid is added. Some leftover corn, green beans and turkey would all taste great in here.

Other ways to turn a turkey dinner into an eggy breakfast: Fig and Brie Omelets, Fluffy Scrambled Eggs (just add a little turkey and serve with leftover rolls), Grain Bowls and Soft-Boiled Eggs (to use up all your roasted veggies).



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Southwest-Style Turkey Hash With Creamy Avocado-Cilantro Sauce. Because really, when is a hash a bad idea? This one’s got an assortment of vegetables, including bell peppers, celery, onions, sweet potatoes and red potatoes. Heck, you could even toss in some of your leftover corn casserole and it will fit right in!



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Dorie Greenspan’s Next Day Turkey-and-Cranberry Sriracha Strata. If you’re more inclined to toss everything together and bake it until its warm, then try this twist on the savory bread pudding. It uses turkey, cranberry sauce and leftover bread if you’ve got it. This is best if you assemble it at least six hours (or up to eight or so) before baking.

More baked till bubbly things include: Turkey Tetrazzini With Butternut Squash SaucePennsylvania Dutch PotpieLentil Shepherd’s Pie.



(Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Dooky Chase’s Praline Pudding With Praline Liqueur Sauce. If you have leftover rolls that are just about ready to go stale, you know that bread pudding is the answer. This one is decadent and delicious, full of all fall flavors you love.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Amanda Soto/The Washington Post)

Now to get a head start on your holiday baking: Take leftover cranberry sauce and use it to make these Whole-Wheat Jam Thumbprints, which can be stored in the freezer for several months. If you opted to make a no-cook relish, use it to infuse vodka or gin, then use that booze for your holiday-time cocktails.

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