If you’re watching the 91st Academy Awards on Sunday, you’ll need recipes that are dressed for the occasion. (Plus plenty of popcorn and bubbly, of course.)

So roll out the red carpet — these selections are as good as gold.

This year we’ve paired recipes with several categories, because although the threat of commercial breaks during awards presentations has passed, the need to give a food-related shout-out to people both in front of the camera and behind the scenes has not.


(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

For best actor/actress in a leading role, you’ll need a main dish. But not just any main: You want it to shine as bright as the star of your budding culinary skills. Pass the envelope, please. The honors go to Double Crunch Honey Garlic Chicken.



(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

The best actor and actress in a supporting role may not be the main attraction, but that doesn’t make them any less compelling — just like these Chopped String Beans With Basil and Pine Nuts. They’re bright, herbaceous and have some crunch, thanks to the toasted pine nuts. A fitting foil to our protagonist.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

A costume designer knows just how to manipulate materials and transform them into something striking, which is how you’ll feel when making this Roasted Fennel and Lemon Salad With Turmeric Walnuts. The fennel’s licorice-like notes mellow; thin slices of lemon are blanched before being roasted, taming their bitter bite; and walnuts are candied in turmeric- and crushed-pepper-spiked honey. Put it all together for the perfect ensemble.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Short films tell an absorbing story while keeping their run-time low, but their one-bite nature doesn’t make them any less complex — just like these Mascarpone Apricots. They’re at once tart and sweet, creamy and crunchy. Best of all, they take mere minutes to make.



(Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Without the work of makeup and hairstyling, those actors would still be beautiful and salty, much like feta cheese. But through the magic of eyeshadow palettes and hairspray — or orange zest, oil and spices — the blank slate can become something else entirely: Marinated Feta. Serve with crackers or crusty bread.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Do you know the difference between sound editing and mixing? We didn’t really until we read an article about it, which included this tidbit: The supervising sound editors for “A Quiet Place” shot a grape with a stun gun and slowed that sound down 80 percent to create the film’s monster sounds. Naturally, this has us craving Chocolate Grapes — at just three ingredients, they look like chocolate truffles but surprise you with the pop of sweet grape within.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Adapting a screenplay is no easy task — you must nod to the original work while infusing the script with originality. Such was the case with our Royal Wedding Cake, a rich and beautiful interpretation of the lemon elderflower cake made by Claire Ptak for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. We know we’re biased, but can you just give us an Oscar for this one, please?

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