My desk here at The Washington Post is so full of tea tins, it looks as if I’m running a shop. So, yes, I love to drink tea — daily, even multiple times a day.

A steaming cuppa is the best, most obvious way to use tea. You should also think about treating it like any other flavorful ingredient to infuse or color a wide array of dishes.

Here are some tea-riffic (you know I had to) recipes from our archives. Enjoy with (or without) a mug of your favorite variety.

Constant Comment Glaze, above. Consider this your wintry secret weapon. ’Tis the season for this beloved Bigelow brand tea, which includes black tea, dried orange rind and spices. We think the glaze goes especially well with winter squash, but it would not be out of place on ham or another type of pork.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Mary Berry’s Orange Tea Bread. You probably already adore the queen of British baking, but here’s another reason to. This one-bowl quick bread starts with dried fruit soaked overnight in tea, and you can customize both ingredients to suit your taste and pantry supplies.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Fortune Cookies. Two tablespoons of strong tea is just one way the homemade version surpasses those plastic-wrapped staples of takeout bags.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Vegan Chai Ice Cream. I created my own riff on the Indian spiced tea for this coconut-based treat. Feel free to adjust the spices to achieve a flavor you like.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Earl Grey White Chocolate Truffles. I’m also proud of these elegant sweets that would be right at home during afternoon tea. If Earl Grey is not your thing, you can swap in the tea of your choice.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Green Tea Shortbread With Poppy Seeds. The tea here lends color and a pleasantly bitter edge to an otherwise sweet cookie. For another green tea option, check out these Toasted Coconut Brown Butter Matcha Crispies.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Spicy Smoked Tea-Pecan Crisps. Smoky Lapsang souchong tea is not for everyone, but if you’re a fan, you’ll adore this sophisticated snack. Serve with cocktails, cheese or both.



(Laura Chase de Formigny for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

No-Booze Penicillin. Lapsang souchong also stars in this nonalcoholic cocktail, where it’s blended with ginger, honey and lemon juice.



(Goran Kosanovic for The Washington Post)

Caribbean Breeze Toddy. Brighten your winter with a spin on the cold-weather cocktail that pairs rum with vibrant red hibiscus tea.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Tea-Infused Rice Noodle SoupHerbal lavender-lemon tea is the unexpected addition to this take on pho, though it wouldn’t be out of bounds to substitute another variety you like.

More from Voraciously:

Take the sweetest trip around the country with these 14 American regional cookie recipes

This hot-and-sour soup recipe is a cure-all for cold (and have-a-cold) days

India’s sweet, syrup-soaked fried dough meets Bundt in this delectable gulab jamun cake