Winter is prime season for braising: Meat and vegetables, cooked in a flavorful liquid that just begs for bread or grains. Prepared on the stove top or in the oven, braised dishes can warm and scent the kitchen for hours. And, depending on whether you want it to take more or less time, you can also use the slow cooker or pressure cooker/multicooker for braising.

So, if warm, stew-y dishes represent the kind of comfort you crave this time of year, you’ll be more than happy to put together one of these recipes from our archives:

Five-Spice Braised Short Ribs, above. These are so temptingly aromatic, your mouth will be watering hours before they’re actually done. The recipe calls for serving this with steamed broccoli, but you can also go for the vegetable of your choosing, including snow peas or carrots. Rice would be great for soaking up the flavorful liquid, too.



(Laura Chase de Formigny for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Wine-Braised Pot Roast. Begging to be used for a good Sunday supper, this classic holds well for several days in the refrigerator if you have leftovers.



(Laura Chase de Formigny for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Skillet-Braised Spiced Potatoes and Chickpeas. You don’t need meat to braise, as this Indian-inspired dish will show you.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Braised Chicken Thighs With White Beans and Pancetta. Pull out your multicooker for this hearty all-in-one meal that makes the most of flavorful chicken thighs and canned beans. Crusty bread is a perfect accompaniment.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Braised Collards With Tomato and Chicken Sausage Over Polenta. Braises don’t always have to take hours in the oven. Here’s one that goes on the stove top and combines Italian and Southern cuisines.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Slow Cooker Tea-Braised Chuck Roast With Ginger and Orange. Budget eight hours for this happy marriage of meat, tea and bright citrus. Or you can choose the speedier pressure-cooked version.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Braised Chicken Thighs With Tomatillos. One-pot meals are always wonderful, but you’ll appreciate this Mexican dish more than most, thanks to the sunny tomatillos, lime and cilantro.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post)

Braised Brussels Sprouts. More ways to eat Brussels sprouts? Yes, especially if it involves braising liquid similar to barbecue sauce.

More from Voraciously:

This spicy, streamlined chicken Parmesan is saucy and crispy in all the right ways

This buttery British shortbread is our new favorite 5-ingredient treat

This hot-and-sour soup recipe is a cure-all for cold (and have-a-cold) days