Loaf pans are one of the most practical kitchen tools. They don’t have the fancy ridges of a Bundt. They lack the drama of a tube pan. And, yet, there’s so much you can do with them.

Most often I turn to mine — I have both a 5-by-9-inch and the more diminutive 4 1/2-by-8 1/2-inch — for quick breads. Those baked goods that, let’s be honest, skew more toward cake are loaf pans’ bread and butter. You’ll find some great recipes from our archives for those here, as well as a few yeasted breads and another couple of options that might surprise you.

Walnut and Halvah Cake, above. Halvah, a sweet tahini confection, makes a wonderful filling that gets gooey and slightly caramelized when baked in the middle of this loaf. Plain is great, but if you find the marbled variety with chocolate swirled in, give it a go.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Marie Ostrosky for The Washington Post)

Naturally Sweet Banana BreadDates mean there’s no added sugar here, and they lend a lovely moist texture and slight toffee flavor.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Madeira Cake. Do Mrs. Patmore proud with this delicate, elegant and simple British creation from “The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook.”



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Dark and Stormy Icebox Cake. Loaf pans aren’t just for baking. Use them to shape this cool and refreshing icebox cake inspired by the rum and lime cocktail.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Sesame Candies. Here’s another no-bake option. This stove top confection will remind you of those plastic-wrapped sweets you may have enjoyed.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie Benwick/The Washington Post)

Bring Joy Coconut Chocolate CandiesIf candy’s more your thing than cake, step right up to this homemade version of Almond Joys.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Honey Molasses Whole-Wheat BreadThis hearty quick bread is more bread than cake and takes well to toasting.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

White-Wheat Sandwich Bread. The basic sandwich bread you may have grown up eating gets a nutritional boost with white whole-wheat flour. And this is a recipe well-suited to people who don’t bake a ton.



(Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Amish-Style Milk BreadIt takes very little effort to make this no-knead dough. Still, you’ll be rewarded with two beautiful loaves.

More from Voraciously:

Want to learn how to bake? These sweet recipes and guides will help you do it.

So long, Thomas’s: These no-knead English muffins are the ones to beat

8 chickpea recipes that prove this legume is a do-it-all pantry star

If there’s no pasta to be found, get your noodle fix with one of these 7 recipes