While some folks are quarantining with friends, family, roommates or a combination of the three, others are home alone. With only one mouth to feed, it’s important not to make too much food at once, create waste or overcrowd your freezer. Plus, it’s no good making huge batches of something you may get sick of eating.

We pulled recipes with small yields for those who are trying to keep a little variety in their weekly rotation. Remember that recipes in our Recipe Finder can be scaled to the amount you need.

Broiled Salmon With Citrus-Mint Relish, above.  Just because you’re all by yourself doesn’t mean you can’t feel special. Quickly broiled salmon with a bright, zippy relish leaves you feeling refreshed. If you can’t find mint, no worries. Any tender herb will work wonderfully here. Can’t find any fresh herbs? Read about how to substitute dried. This yields two servings; the second can be saved and served cold or at room temperature, flaked on top of a rice bowl or salad.


(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Pantry Ramen. Instant ramen should never be considered an outdated relic of college days, not when you can gussy it up. With just a few special tweaks, instant ramen becomes much more complex and tasty.


(Renee Comet for The Washington Post; styling by Bonnie S. Benwick)

Sunday Brunch Omelet. Brunch at home? You bet. This hearty, luxurious omelet takes on the French technique for a smooth, glossy exterior and custardy middle. You’re worth it.


(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Super-Quick ‘Baked’ Fruit and Yogurt Mug. A quick, lightly sweet and warm mug full of fruit, granola and yogurt makes for tasty breakfast. Plus, you put it together in a mug, meaning less dishwashing for you.


(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

BLT With Sriracha Mayo. You already know a sandwich is a great quick meal. Adding a few tweaks can help you out of your sandwich rut. A little sriracha in your BLT elevates the flavor. Read Becky Krystal’s guide to amping up your sandwiches for more inspiration.


(Justin Tsucalas for The Washington Post; food styling by Nichole Bryant for The Washington Post)

Simplest Lentil Curry. A hearty lentil soup that yields just two servings is a boon right now. It’s a warm and well-spiced number from our Plant Powered Newsletter series.


(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Okonomiyaki With Smoked Tofu. These crunchy, cabbage-based pancakes are infinitely adaptable to whatever you have on hand. Got bell peppers? Add them. Got scallions growing on your windowsill? Use those. If you can’t find smoked tofu, use regular. No tofu at all? Skip it! The batter makes two pancakes and can be stored in the fridge so you can make one now, one later.

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