Good ginger is spicy and aromatic. Popular in pan-Asian cooking — and beyond — the knobbly root stem is a flavor powerhouse with a zippy touch. It’s also often used as a sore throat soother and a spicy tea infuser.

So add a little pep to your weekly recipe roster with a hit this mighty rhizome. For more gingery recipes, search for ginger in our Recipe Finder.

Stir-Fried Beef With Ginger and Scallions, above. This recipe uses six ounces of ginger. Every one of those ounces belongs in this dish, adding zest with a little mellowing from honey.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Rhubarb, Ginger and Mustard Relish. First: Have you heard that rhubarb can be savory? Second: Have you heard of using ginger to punch up a relish? This one marries well with meat or an oily fish.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Green Beans in Ginger Sauce. This sauce feels light but is powerfully flavorful.



(Laura Chase de Formigny for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Roasted Salmon and Broccoli With Ginger-Soy Marinade. Marinate salmon in ginger and soy for a simple weeknight meal.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Ginger Turmeric Chickpeas With Roasted Cherry Tomatoes. Simple and quick are the goals for quarantine meals. Chickpeas spiced with ginger, turmeric and cumin pair wonderfully with roasted cherry tomatoes.



(Jennifer Chase for The Washington Post)

Ginger Ginger Cookies. Sweet treats also benefit from a punch of ginger. Two types of ginger — ground and crystallized — give these cookies a warm, spicy punch.

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