(Photo by HomeVisit) the house abounds with architectural details typically found in historic homes — elliptical archways with keystone accents, fluted columns, wainscoting, transoms, crown molding and a coffered ceiling.

Some people prefer older houses because of their charm and character, while others are drawn to newer ones because of their modern amenities. Then there are homes that benefit from both old and new.

The past and present interact in this residence in the Berkley neighborhood of Northwest Washington. Traditional touches meld with contemporary conveniences to create a house that seems of another age.

Designed by Ankie Barnes of Barnes Vanze Architects and built by Richard Zantzinger of Mauck Zantzinger & Associates in 2009, the house abounds with architectural details typically found in historic homes — elliptical archways with keystone accents, fluted columns, wainscoting, transoms, crown molding and a coffered ceiling.

The rich patina and chevron design of the oak floors lend elegance to the entrance hall. The floors on the main level were made from wood sourced from a Pennsylvania barn. Some of the boards are believed to be nearly 300 years old.

The library was inspired by one in an Illinois home that was designed by well-known Chicago architect David Adler. Its gothic arches and faux bois finish on the walls make it the ideal spot for curling up with a good book.

The shape of the house — more of an obtuse angle than a perpendicular L — creates a traditional flow, allowing the rooms to weave into one another.

On the main level, stately formal living and dining rooms at the front of the house give way to an open floor plan in the back. The kitchen opens to the family room, which leads to the pool area. The secluded back yard has a covered veranda and a heated salt-water pool with fountains.


(Photo by HomeVisit) The library was inspired by one in an Illinois home that was designed by well-known Chicago architect David Adler.

Four of the seven bedrooms are on the second floor, including the master suite. The master bedroom has French doors that open to a balcony, his-and-hers dressing rooms with adjoining bathrooms and separate office space.

The lower level has a generously sized rec room, a fitness room, a workroom with a dog-washing station and an in-law suite with bathroom, kitchenette and private entrance.

The house is heated and cooled by a geothermal energy system, among the most energy- and cost-efficient heating and cooling systems available today.


(Photo by HomeVisit) The secluded back yard has a covered veranda and a heated salt-water pool with fountains.

The exterior of the home also gives the impression that it has been around longer than seven years. The white washed brick, pea gravel courtyard and mature landscaping provide an attractive entrance.

The seven-bedroom, nine-bathroom, 7,651-square-foot house — which is steps away from one of the trailheads to Glover Archbold Park — is listed at $4.995 million. Homeowners association fees are $1,200 per quarter.

Listing: 2170 Dunmore Lane NW, Washington, D.C.

Listing agent: Eileen McGrath, Washington Fine Properties

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