(Photo by HomeVisit) The 1946 single-story ranch house was transformed by architect David Jameson into a two-story contemporary home.

By binding together cubes of various sizes and shapes, renowned D.C.-based architect David Jameson transformed an unremarkable ranch-style house into a striking contemporary home in the Arlington Ridge community. Although the footprint of the 1946 house remains, its shape and size have been dramatically altered.

Jameson did more than open a few walls and plop a second-story addition on the low-slung house. He created a Jengalike structure with boxes positioned next to and on top of one another.

The original house was built by John Theron Coulter, an Air Force officer who married actress Constance Bennett while he was in Hollywood working on training films. Bennett, who starred with Cary Grant in “Topper,” was one of Hollywood’s highest-paid actresses and one of the first female film producers. After marrying Coulter, her fifth husband, Bennett left her Hollywood career. The Coulters sold the house in the early 1950s and moved to Georgetown.

The textures of the green screen and stone wall at the entrance help to soften the hardness of the stucco and Hardie board siding exterior. A massive 5-foot-by-9-foot entry door provides a welcoming reception.

Because the owners are enthusiastic collectors of contemporary art, Jameson designed the interior with generous surfaces to display their collection. The white walls, along with the natural light that filters through large panes of glass, make the home bright and airy. Polished terrazzo and concrete floors on the main level add sleekness.

To the right, the living room, dining room, kitchen and breakfast area easily flow from one to another. To the left, the family room and guest bedroom with en-suite bathroom are separate and distinct spaces.


(Photo by HomeVisit) The white walls, along with the natural light that filters through large panes of glass, make the home bright and airy.

Plenty of modern kitchens contrast light with dark — white countertops with ebony cabinetry. This one has a clean, crisp look with four-inch-thick white Corian countertops and stainless steel on the cabinetry.

Up the Vermont-maple-clad stairs, the top level is traversed by a bridge between the master suite and the secondary bedrooms. Outside, a large balcony spans the length of the bridge. The master suite takes up the home’s entire west wing. The 300-square-foot dressing room has an island with stainless steel cabinetry and a four-inch-thick Corian countertop. A wall of glass blurs the line between indoor and outdoor in the bedroom.


(Photo by HomeVisit) The 300-square-foot dressing room has an island with stainless steel cabinetry and a four-inch-thick Corian countertop.

The lower level has a wine cellar, rec room, eat-in kitchen and bedroom with an en-suite bathroom. There is a two-car garage. A 700-square-foot secluded terrace encourages outdoor entertaining.

This project continued to add to Jameson’s design-award haul. He received the 2009 American Institute of Architects Washington chapter residence design award, the 2009 AIA Northern Virginia chapter award of excellence and the 2009 Design Arlington award of excellence. The home has been featured in Architecture DC magazine, DC Modern Luxury and on HGTV’s “My Big Amazing Renovation.”

The five-bedroom, six-bathroom, 5,000-square-foot house is listed at $2.395 million.

Listing: 2765 Fort Scott Dr., Arlington, Va.

Listing agents: Kimberly Casey and Daryl Judy, Washington Fine Properties

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