(Photo by Maxwell Mackenzie) The generously sized living room has one of the home’s six fireplaces. The hand-carved stone fireplace mantel comes from Chesney’s of England.

It took about 216 tons of Indiana limestone — the same limestone used at the Pentagon, Washington National Cathedral and the west front of the Capitol — to build this mansion in the Kent neighborhood of Northwest Washington.

Designed by Jones & Boer Architects and constructed by Banks Development, the newly built home is on the market for $22 million, making it the most expensive house for sale in the District.

The mansion replaces another stunning manor. The property was the site of Peggy Cooper Cafritz’s residence before a fire destroyed it in 2009. A Washington Post article about the blaze noted: “When fire gutted Peggy Cooper Cafritz’s house Wednesday night, it wasn’t just a woman losing her abode. A neighborhood lost its signature architectural landmark.”

The property was going to be subdivided into several homes, but neighbors objected. Instead, a sprawling 14,774-square-foot mansion that blends Georgian and Federal styles was built. The house was inspired by 18th-century homes designed by Sir John Nash, the British architect who created Buckingham Palace.

The design of the facade comes from a plate in the book “Parallel of the Classical Orders of Architecture” by Johann Matthaus von Mauch and Charles Pierre Joseph Normand. The columns, entablature, casing and arches echo the Theater of Marcellus in Rome.

In the entrance hall, a gently curved stairway with a bronze balustrade rises to the second floor. White oak in wide, long planks covers the floors.


(Photo by Maxwell Mackenzie) The mansion was designed by Jones Boer Architects and constructed by Banks Development.

The generously sized living room with one of the home’s six fireplaces has three French doors that open to a limestone portico. The fireplace’s hand-carved stone mantel is by Chesney’s of England. Its split firebrick is arranged in a herringbone pattern. In addition to formal living and dining rooms, the first floor contains a guest bedroom with en suite bathroom, a library, a kitchen and a family room.

The second-floor master suite has a separate sitting room, terrace, his-and-her bathrooms and his-and-her walk-in closets. Four additional bedrooms each with its own en suite bathroom are on that floor.

The lower level includes an exercise room with sauna and steam, a media room with a 90-inch flat screen HD TV and a surround sound system, a game room, a wine cellar and two staff bedrooms each with en suite bathrooms and a shared kitchen. A geothermal heating and cooling system warms and cools the house.


(Photo by Maxwell Mackenzie) A spacious lawn unspools to a limestone dining terrace. Arentz Landscape Architects designed the outdoor spaces.

Designed by Arentz Landscape Architects, a spacious lawn unspools to a limestone dining terrace, which sits under a canopy of hawthorn trees. A double staircase with wrought iron handrails descends to a lower garden with a classically inspired limestone pool pavilion. A computer controlled irrigation system and landscape lighting enhance the gardens.

The eight-bedroom, 13-bathroom house is on 0.89 acres.

Listing: 3030 Chain Bridge Rd. NW, Washington, D.C.

Listing agent: Marc Fleisher, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

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Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified the architectural firm. It is Jones & Boer Architects.