How much money do people around the world have to spend each month? The map below from Movehub.com shows monthly disposable income per person -- or the income each person has to spend after all taxes have been paid – for countries around the world. The countries with the deepest pockets, those with more than $3,500 a month, are shown in dark blue. Those with the smallest amount of disposable income, $400 or less a month, are shown in red.


The map shows that the wealthiest country by this measure is Switzerland, with an average of $6,301 a month. That's about two to three times as much as its (still wealthy) neighbors Germany ($2,851) and France ($2,760), in part due to Switzerland’s low taxes.


U.S. average disposable income comes out to $3,258 per person per month, which is about a sixth higher than Canada’s average. However, personal disposable income varies quite widely across the U.S and Canada. As Movehub points out, personal disposable income in Washington, D.C. is $5,450 a month, about twice as high as in Mississippi ($2,650).

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Monthly disposable income in Japan is roughly on par with Germany and France, an outlier in East Asia. The map also shows has China now has significantly more disposable income ($731) than other Asian countries.


Obviously, disposable incomes are quite a bit lower in Africa.


Incomes in South America are a little higher. Argentina ranks as the country with the most average disposable income, $1,018.58 a month.

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Central America covers a wide range, from the relatively wealthy Cayman Islands to poorer Cuba and El Salvador.

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As does Oceania, where incomes range from $3,780.69 in Australia to less than $1,000 in Fiji.

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Movehub's data comes via Numbeo.com and was adapted by NationMaster from a series of surveys carried out in 2010-2014. Data for North America comes from the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development and Statistics Quebec.

Note: An earlier version of this post contained a different map for Africa, which showed a high disposable income for Zambia. Sergui George, who compiled the data for MoveHub, said that high income is because the range of surveyed incomes are quite high, distorting the average. To avoid conveying an inaccurate survey, we've taken out the data for Zambia.