We wrote on Monday about some new research showing how woefully confused most people are about inequality, not just in the U.S. but around the world. People tend to be very, very bad at accurately answering questions about the shape of the income distribution in their country, the share of people living in poverty, and the typical incomes made by workers at the top and bottom.

If you read all of that and felt for sure that the researchers' diagnosis — "widespread ignorance and misperceptions of inequality" — applies to everyone but you, this quiz is for you. We welcome presidential candidates to take it, too.

1

These diagrams show different types of society. Which one describes the shape of American society?

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2

These diagrams show the American population divided equally into five groups by income level. The bars show the percent of total income that each group gets in a given year. Bigger bars mean a bigger slice of the overall income pie. Which one best describes the U.S.?

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3

Okay. These diagrams represent how average household income, in constant dollars, has changed for the top 20%, middle 20%, and bottom 20% of American families between 1967 and 2012. Which one is accurate?

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4

These bars represent the median income for fast food cooks, elementary school teachers and CEOs in 2014. Which one is the most accurate?

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5

These charts show how the ratio of CEO pay to average worker pay has changed since 1965. The bigger the value, the more CEOs make relative to their workers. Which one is correct?

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6

Let's talk about poverty. Each diagram shows 100 children in the United States. The ones highlighted in blue are currently living in poverty. Which one is accurate?

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7

Last one! This chart shows the Gini index, a measure of inequality, among the 34 wealthy nations belonging to the OECD. A bigger bar means more inequality. Which bar is the United States?

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Your score: 0 / 7