The Washington Post

A new study suggests that periods of uncertainty are worse for innovation than any particular political party -- though it's a little more complicated than it seems.

Right now, the United States is in the top tier of science spending. How long will that last?

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Nov 19, 2013
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It's great to screen everyone for HIV, but providing counseling is really expensive -- and now we know it doesn't always work.

  • Harold Pollack
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  • Oct 30, 2013
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Everything you ever wanted to know (and some things you didn't) about the science of "Gravity"

Lawmakers are hurting scientific research in the United States. On the other hand, China is still nowhere near catching up.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Oct 17, 2013
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Being warned of PolitiFact's presence reduces a candidate's likelihood of getting a bad grade from the group by 55 percent.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Oct 8, 2013
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Another day, another survey trying to quantify the expert consensus on climate change. So why don't these studies ever have an impact on public opinion?

  • Brad Plumer
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  • May 18, 2013
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Sarah and I discuss Obama's new brain-mapping initiative and what it says about the state of U.S. science.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Apr 3, 2013
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Government funding for scientific research is set to fall and then stagnate in the decade ahead. Scientists are warning that the U.S. could lose its technological edge. But how dire is the situation, really?

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Feb 26, 2013
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A simple breakdown of why physicists still can't agree on how to interpret quantum mechanics — and why it matters.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Feb 7, 2013
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Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) has created a new kind of award in order to show how seemingly obscure research funded by the government can result in revolutionary, unexpected scientific breakthroughs. The first recipients studied microwaves, jellyfish, and coral.

  • Suzy Khimm
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  • Sep 14, 2012
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This week, the press is giving plenty of attention to two climate papers, one from "converted skeptic" Richard Muller and one from current skeptic Anthony Watts. But neither have gone through the traditional peer-review process. And neither seem to be all that significant. Do they really deserve this much hype?

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Jul 30, 2012
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Stanford University's Robert Sapolsky delivers a super interesting lecture on the science of pleasure - and how that motivates our behavior everywhere from the casino to the college classroom.

  • Sarah Kliff
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  • Jul 13, 2012
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The recent discovery of the Higgs boson in Europe was a landmark scientific accomplishment. And it could have happened in the United States -- but Congress wasn't willing to pay the price.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Jul 5, 2012
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