Palestinian students share a schoolbook while studying in the school library in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Feb. 4, 2013. Israelis and Palestinians depict each other in schoolbooks as an enemy and largely deny their adversary's history and existence, according to a U.S. government-funded study published on Monday. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman Palestinian students share a schoolbook while studying in the school library in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Feb. 4, 2013. Israelis and Palestinians depict each other in schoolbooks as an enemy and largely deny their adversary's history and existence, according to a U.S. government-funded study published on Monday. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman

WASHINGTON – State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland did rhetorical backflips Monday to avoid taking any position on a new U.S.-funded study that faulted both Palestinian and Israeli textbooks as misleading and one-sided.

“We don't get ourselves in the middle,” Nuland said during a lengthy back and forth with reporters trying to get her to rate the objectivity of the report, say whether the United States agreed or disagreed or whether it planned to make any use of the study.