An angry mob grabbed Vitaly Zhuravsky and dumped him in a garbage bin outside parliament on Tuesday. The group was angry at a bill, authored by Zhuravsky, tightening restrictions on anti-government protesters. (Reuters)

Video emerged Tuesday from Kiev of an angry mob frog-marching a member of parliament and literally dumping him in the trash. Vitaly Zhuravsky is held down by his assailants, splashed with water and buffeted by a loose tire before getting wheeled away in the dumpster and retrieved by some conspicuously disinterested security personnel.

Zhuravsky is a former member of the political party of former president Viktor Yanukovych, who was ousted following months of protests in February. Some reports suggest he was targeted because of his role in the passage of a bill in January that restricted freedom of speech.

"We live in a country where blood flows because of you," shouted at least one protester to the sprawled deputy, reported Reuters.

This attack took place on the same day the Ukrainian government of President Petro Poroshenko ratified an agreement with the European Union and also proposed self-rule for two restive regions in eastern Ukraine, as well as amnesty for pro-Russian rebels fighting there. Their separatist insurgency has raised the specter of full-blown war with Russia. Some in Kiev, particularly among Ukraine's nationalist far-right, were very displeased with the proposed ceasefire agreement.

"A capitulation was announced today in this war," said Oleh Tiagnybok, the leader of the nationalist Svoboda party, as reported by the BBC. Zhuravsky's incident brought to mind a filmed scene in April when Svoboda members attacked a head of a Kiev TV station and forced him to resign on camera.

It's unclear who the protesters who threw Zhuravsky into the dumpster were. A large group, including members of the far-right group Pravy Sektor, had earlier encircled the parliament building, demanding the passage of a "lustration" bill, which would vet government officials on the basis of their roles in the country's previous administrations, many of which still carry the stigma of corruption.